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Monthly Archives: September 2019


Clay Bennett Comic Strip for September 29, 2019

The cons are always discovered and the perp(s) are always uncovered and jailed!

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Chris Britt Comic Strip for September 27, 2019


 

Donald J. Trump

Verified account

@realDonaldTrump
28m
28 minutes ago

THE GREATEST SCAM IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN POLITICS!
9,288 replies
4,435 retweets
18,284 likes

Apparently loose lips do sink ships as well as Presidencies.

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Opinion
Donald Trump
As a foreign reporter visiting the US I was stunned by Trump’s press conference

Lenore Taylor
Despite being subjected to a daily diet of Trump headlines, I was unprepared for the president’s alarming incoherence
@lenoretaylor
Fri 20 Sep 2019 02.00 EDT
Last modified on Fri 20 Sep 2019 12.02 EDT
As a regular news reader I thought I was across the eccentricities of the US president. Most mornings in Australia begin with news from America – the bid to buy Greenland, adjustments to a weather map hand-drawn with a Sharpie or another self-aggrandising tweet. Our headlines and news bulletins, like headlines and news bulletins everywhere, are full of Trump.
As a political reporter for most of the last 30 years I have also endured many long and rambling political press conferences with Australian prime ministers and world leaders.
But watching a full presidential Trump press conference while visiting the US this week I realised how much the reporting of Trump necessarily edits and parses his words, to force it into sequential paragraphs or impose meaning where it is difficult to detect.

The press conference I tuned into by chance from my New York hotel room was held in Otay Mesa, California, and concerned a renovated section of the wall on the Mexican border.
I joined as the president was explaining at length how powerful the concrete was. Very powerful, it turns out. It was unlike any wall ever built, incorporating the most advanced “concrete technology”. It was so exceptional that would-be wall-builders from three unnamed countries had visited to learn from it.
There were inner tubes in the wall that were also filled with concrete, poured in via funnels, and also “rebars” so the wall would withstand anyone attempting to cut through it with a blowtorch.
The wall went very deep and could not be burrowed under. Prototypes had been tested by 20 “world-class mountain climbers – That’s all they do, they love to climb mountains”, who had been unable to scale it.
It was also “wired, so that we will know if somebody is trying to break through”, although one of the attending officials declined a presidential invitation to discuss this wiring further, saying, “Sir, there could be some merit in not discussing it”, which the president said was a “very good answer”.
The wall was “amazing”, “world class”, “virtually impenetrable” and also “a good, strong rust colour” that could later be painted. It was designed to absorb heat, so it was “hot enough to fry an egg on”. There were no eggs to hand, but the president did sign his name on it and spoke for so long the TV feed eventually cut away, promising to return if news was ever made.
In writing about this not-especially-important or unusual press conference I’ve run into what US reporters must encounter every day
He did, at one point, concede that would-be immigrants, unable to scale, burrow, blow torch or risk being burned, could always walk around the incomplete structure, but that would require them walking a long way. This seemed to me to be an important point, but the monologue quickly returned to the concrete.
In writing about this not-especially-important or unusual press conference I’ve run into what US reporters must encounter every day. I’ve edited skittering, half-finished sentences to present them in some kind of consequential order and repeated remarks that made little sense.
In most circumstances, presenting information in as intelligible a form as possible is what we are trained for. But the shock I felt hearing half an hour of unfiltered meanderings from the president of the United States made me wonder whether the editing does our readers a disservice.
I’ve read so many stories about his bluster and boasting and ill-founded attacks, I’ve listened to speeches and hours of analysis, and yet I was still taken back by just how disjointed and meandering the unedited president could sound. Here he was trying to land the message that he had delivered at least something towards one of his biggest campaign promises and sounding like a construction manager with some long-winded and badly improvised sales lines.
I’d understood the dilemma of normalising Trump’s ideas and policies – the racism, misogyny and demonisation of the free press. But watching just one press conference from Otay Mesa helped me understand how the process of reporting about this president can mask and normalise his full and alarming incoherence.
• Lenore Taylor is the editor of Guardian Australia.

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Henry Louis Mencken was a 20th century journalist who wrote for the Baltimore Sun newspaper. There was a quote attributed to him which was brought to my attention, the quote I was given was altered to read:Inline image

The correct quote is listed below in the second paragraph. The meaning is the same just the wording is different.

Mencken wrote as follows about the difficulties of good men reaching national office when such campaigns must necessarily be conducted remotely:
The larger the mob, the harder the test. In small areas, before small electorates, a first-rate man occasionally fights his way through, carrying even the mob with him by force of his personality. But when the field is nationwide, and the fight must be waged chiefly at second and third hand, and the force of personality cannot so readily make itself felt, then all the odds are on the man who is, intrinsically, the most devious and mediocre — the man who can most easily adeptly disperse the notion that his mind is a virtual vacuum.

“The Presidency tends, year by year, to go to such men. As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.^ Mencken, Baltimore Evening Sun, July 26, 1920.”

We are now in that time when this prediction has become real.

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If Botch McConnell doesn’t blink!. MA.

Jennifer Rubin 21 hrs ago

Reports: Trump’s UN meeting with Ukraine…
Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.
President Trump tweeted on Thursday as the whistleblower scandal was unfolding: “Is anybody dumb enough to believe that I would say something inappropriate with a foreign leader while on such a potentially ‘heavily populated’ call?” Actually, any sentient being knows that Trump has no idea what is and is not appropriate, so he would absolutely say something on a call that others found shocking. He told George Stephanopoulos he would take help from a foreign power again. He told Lester Holt he was thinking of Russia when he fired James Comey as FBI director. Trump is precisely the sort of person to say something deeply incriminating.
And that brings us to The Post’s latest bombshell: “A whistleblower complaint about President Trump made by an intelligence official centers on Ukraine, according to two people familiar with the matter, which has set off a struggle between Congress and the executive branch.” And it gets worse:
Two and a half weeks before the complaint was filed, Trump spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, a comedian and political newcomer who was elected in a landslide in May.
That call is already under investigation by House Democrats who are examining whether Trump and his attorney Rudolph W. Giuliani sought to manipulate the Ukrainian government into helping Trump’s reelection campaign. Lawmakers have demanded a full transcript and a list of participants on the call.
Trump and his fixer Giuliani, it has been widely reported, have been pressuring Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden based on a groundless theory that as vice president he was helping his son, who sat on the board of a Ukrainian gas company. (Biden was accused of getting a prosecutor investigating his son’s company fired. In fact, “The investigation into Burisma, Hunter Biden’s employer, had ground to a halt long before the prosecutor was sacked. A subsequent probe into the company’s owner was opened because of a request from Ukrainian legislators, not because of prosecutorial initiative.”)
Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) adds this interesting account:

Chris Murphy
✔ @ChrisMurphyCT
A few weeks ago in Ukraine, I met w President Zelensky and we discussed the surprise cut off of aid and the inappropriate demands the Trump campaign was making of him. The obvious question everyone in Kiev was asking was – were the two things connected? https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/whistleblower-complaint-about-president-trump-involves-ukraine-according-to-two-people-familiar-with-the-matter/2019/09/19/07e33f0a-daf6-11e9-bfb1-849887369476_story.html

17.3K
9:17 PM – Sep 19, 2019
Twitter Ads info and privacy

8,297 people are talking about this
All of this raises the question as to whether the multiple actions amounted to a “promise” by Trump to release aid in exchange for Ukraine’s help investigating Biden. Aside from possibly implicating bribery statutes, there could be no clearer example of a “High Crime & Misdemeanor” than in using government revenue to extort a foreign power to help you get reelected. Constitutional scholar Laurence Tribe tells me that such an arrangement would probably meet the definition “within the meaning of the Constitution’s phrase ‘Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors,’ although it might well fail to meet the narrow definition of ‘bribery’ for purposes of criminal prosecution under 18 U.S.C. § 201.”
But make no mistake: This would be the perfect example of conduct that might not technically be a crime but is obviously and blatantly a violation of the president’s oath of office and a threat to our democratic system. Former prosecutor Renato Mariotti tweeted, “If Trump promised foreign aid to Ukraine in exchange for investigating Biden’s son, that is obviously corrupt and should meet any definition of a ‘high crime’ for impeachment.”
Meanwhile, Giuliani made a wild appearance on CNN. Amid the accusations and insults, he acknowledged that “of course” he asked Ukraine to look into Biden. Umm. That’s a problem.
Even if you took the aid out of it, going to a foreign government to request dirt on a political opponent would be precisely the “collusion” (or illegal conspiracy) that Robert S. Mueller III was investigating. Using taxpayer money (foreign aid) to facilitate such an arrangement makes it doubly corrupt.
Now, we do not know whether this is the basis of the complaint and whether any Trump “promise” was part of a quid pro quo. That is why we need the whistleblower’s complaint released to Congress, a lightning-fast investigation and then, if supported by the facts, a call for Trump to resign or be impeached.
Along the way, there were be enumerable questions as to whether Trump or his attorney general ordered the complaint not to be sent to Congress. There will be questions as to whether Vice President Pence, who went to Ukraine recently and was asked about release of aid by reporters, or former national security adviser John Bolton (who was there as well) knew anything about this.
And of course, we’ll have to see what excuse Republicans come up with for not doing anything. (It was a joke! Deep state!) However, if the facts point to corrupt behavior, impeachment will be a necessity and a political winner for Democrats. And yes, this would be way, way worse than Watergate.

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Read more:
Jennifer Rubin: No patriots to be found: What is the matter with these people?
Jennifer Rubin: What we need to know about the whistleblower
Greg Sargent: As the whistleblower story gets worse for Trump, his corruption keeps spreading
Greg Sargent: Mystery of Adam Schiff and whistleblower takes dangerous new turn
Harry Litman: A whistleblower filed a complaint to the intelligence IG. Why is it being withheld from Congress?
The Post’s View: The Trump administration cannot withhold a whistleblower complaint from Congress


Michael Rosenberg 1 day ago
He excelled at that job, but his employer kept failing. The Lions did not win a playoff game in his nine years. Their ineptitude was comical, unless you cared. One coach hired his son-in-law to be defensive coordinator. A general manager decided on draft night to use a first-round pick on a player he didn’t even want. Veterans would join Detroit and tell Johnson about everything the team did wrong. Eventually he started to notice himself. The front office and coaching staff were rarely aligned. The massage therapist who was there on Fridays and Mondays would be gone the next year. Stuff like that.
Here is a story. In Johnson’s second year, quarterback Jon Kitna said—well, take it away, Calvin: “He left the meeting room one day, and he told the coaches and the whole team that we’re not gonna win a game if we go into the season with [this] system. Somebody should have listened. Because we were 0–16 after that.”
That year, Johnson says, “plenty of guys on the team [said], ‘I don’t know if I want to play football anymore.’ ”
Ah, but Johnson was young. He believed. His next position coach, Shawn Jefferson, asked if he wanted to be truly great, and Johnson said yes, and so Jefferson coached the hell out of him. Johnson calls Jefferson the best receivers coach “I’ve seen in the league.” In 2012, Jefferson helped Johnson break Jerry Rice’s single-season receiving yards record, with 1,964.
That offseason coach Jim Schwartz decided not to renew Jefferson’s contract. “Maybe there’s egos that play [into it],” Johnson says. “I think that was part of it.”
Did he question the organization’s commitment to winning? “Of course. I can say that. And I say it more confidently after I left and saw the way other teams operate.”
Johnson was a highly paid member of a clown show, and he is nobody’s clown. He became the ideal NFL player in the least ideal NFL environment. But he paid for it. The year he broke Rice’s record, he injured a foot, an ankle and both knees. One finger was bent at a 90-degree angle. He says the training staff told him to get it fixed after he retired.
“It’s not about the welfare of the players,” says Johnson, who in his career missed just nine games. It’s “just about having that product.”
He does not think the Lions were different from many teams in that regard. He learned to deal, with the pot on Sunday nights and the work ethic his parents instilled.
“When I got to the league, [there] was opioid abuse,” Johnson says. “You really could go in the training room and get what you wanted. I can get Vicodin, I can get Oxy[contin]. It was too available. I used Percocet and stuff like that. And I did not like the way that made me feel. I had my preferred choice of medicine. Cannabis.”
He got used to concussions. “Bam, hit the ground real hard. I’m seeing stars; I can’t see straight,” he says. “But I know in a couple minutes I’m gonna be fine. Because I’ve done that plenty of times before.” In 2012 he told reporters he suffered one against the Vikings. The Lions said (and maintain) that he passed their concussion protocol, and Johnson later apologized: “I misused the terms nerve damage and concussion.” But he says now, “I knew I was concussed because I blacked out. I wasn’t seeing straight. And they wanted me to change my story.” Mostly, he says, he played through concussions because in his NFL that’s how you earn Employee of the Month.
Now ask yourself: When he retired—after just nine seasons, just 30 years old—did he leave too early? Or too late?

In 2012, Johnson signed a $132 million extension ($60 million guaranteed), promising his services through the 2019 season for substantial compensation. There is no disputing that Detroit had a right to ask for a portion of his signing bonus back. And Johnson paid it. But NFL contracts are not like normal employment contracts. Players get traded, shipped across the country. They get released. If the Lions had dealt Johnson, they would have had to eat the signing bonus. If he had said he was retiring for medical reasons, there’s a good chance he would have been paid.
Johnson took note when the Colts told quarterback Andrew Luck, upon his retirement last month, to keep the rest of his $32 million signing bonus. Indianapolis may have done that partly in the hope that Luck returns someday. But that team’s ownership also seems to understand that Luck played as long as he could bring himself to play.
Johnson says he almost retired after his eighth season, but his father told him he sounded unsure, so he kept playing. He knew the next year would be his last, such was his constant pain. He loved his coach, Jim Caldwell, but he’d seen good players leave and seen dysfunction rule.
Would he have played longer if the Lions had won more? “I think there is a very strong possibility.” He retired at 30. Barry Sanders, too, retired from the Lions at 30. Asked if this is a coincidence, Johnson says, “Not really.”
If this is business, Johnson figures, don’t pretend it’s anything else. Lions president Rod Wood has said publicly that reconnecting with Johnson is “a very high priority” and that he was in contact with the former wideout. But Johnson says they talked only once, when Johnson called the team to get some information for his accountant.
Johnson has told current Lions coach Matt Patricia that he will work with Detroit’s receivers—but not at the team’s practice facility. He has friends in the organization. Quarterback Matthew Stafford is his buddy. And yet… “I wouldn’t necessarily say I cheer for the Lions,” Johnson says. “I cheer for the players.”
He understands that by leaving early he abandoned some dreams. A Super Bowl ring. All-time records. Perhaps the Hall of Fame. But awards are compliments, that’s all. If he makes the Hall—if he gets that compliment—“that’d be cool.” If not, that’s fine too. He will not spend five years waiting for somebody to knock on his hotel room door in Canton to compliment him. “I don’t expect to get in on the first ballot,” he says. “But I do expect to get in eventually. I got 11,000 yards—but if that’s not enough, it’s not enough. If I don’t make it, I’m not gonna stop living life.” (Johnson’s 11,619 total yards rank 30th all-time; among retired players, his 86.1 yards per game ranks first.)
If he doesn’t get in, will he wish he played a little longer?
“No, I won’t,” he says. “I won’t think about it at all.”
The only approval Calvin Johnson needs is in the memorabilia room in his head: “I was a beast during that time; I was hands down the best receiver in the game. I’m not gonna argue with you, but I know I was.”
He holds up a pair of blue Nike cleats. He loved those shoes. He wore them for his last game. At halftime he was ordered to change into white ones. The NFL can control what’s on your feet until the moment you walk away.
Now Johnson lives in a beautiful, tastefully appointed nonmansion in suburban Detroit, a short walk from a lake. Twice a month he flies to Atlanta with Brittney and C.J. to spend the weekend with Caleb. He invests in real estate. His foundation awards scholarships to student-athletes in Atlanta and Detroit. He has two primary businesses: Locker Room Consulting, which helps players prepare for life after sports; and Primitive, the cannabis company he cofounded with former teammate Rob Sims.
He loves running his football camp, but he barely pays attention to the NFL. He plays golf. He goes snowboarding—and, yes, heads turn when a 6’5″ black guy flies down the slopes of Utah. He doesn’t care, though. Gawk at him, or don’t. Remember how great he was, or don’t. Pay him back, or don’t. It’s all fine. His teams went 54–90 in his career, but Calvin Johnson won.
Question or comment? Email us at talkback@themmqb.com.

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Criminals, liars and miscreants do not change. TOTUS is all of the aforementioned and has been since he was a child.The con game is the one he knows best. MA.
KATHERINE FAULDERS, ALEXANDER MALLIN and JOHN SANTUCCI,ABC News 5 hours

 
Trump call involving Ukraine focus of complaint. President Donald Trump’s phone call with a foreign leader that has become the focus of a complaint to the director of national intelligence’s inspector general involved Ukraine, multiple sources familiar with the matter tell ABC News.
Trump reacted Friday, tweeting, “there was nothing said wrong, it was pitch perfect!”
According to a readout released from the White House, Trump spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on July 25 “to congratulate him on his recent election.”
(MORE: Top intelligence official to brief Congress on whistleblower complaint)
A more extensive readout from the Ukrainian president’s office, however, noted that the two also spoke about “investigations into corruption cases that have hampered interaction between Ukraine and the U.S.A.”
The president’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, has publicly and privately urged in recent months for Ukrainian officials to investigate ties between former Vice President Joe Biden’s diplomatic efforts in the country and any connections between his son’s business ventures.

In his tweets Friday morning, Trump began by attacking the Democratic chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff, who’s demanding details of the complaint.
“The Radical Left Democrats and their Fake News Media partners, headed up again by Little Adam Schiff, and batting Zero for 21 against me, are at it again! They think I may have had a “dicey” conversation with a certain foreign leader based on a “highly partisan” whistleblowers … statement,” he said.
“Strange that with so many other people hearing or knowing of the perfectly fine and respectful conversation, that they would not have also come forward. Do you know the reason why they did not? Because there was nothing said wrong, it was pitch perfect!” Trump said.
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
· 6h

The Radical Left Democrats and their Fake News Media partners, headed up again by Little Adam Schiff, and batting Zero for 21 against me, are at it again! They think I may have had a “dicey” conversation with a certain foreign leader based on a “highly partisan” whistleblowers..

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

….statement. Strange that with so many other people hearing or knowing of the perfectly fine and respectful conversation, that they would not have also come forward. Do you know the reason why they did not? Because there was nothing said wrong, it was pitch perfect!

41K
8:27 AM – Sep 20, 2019

The Washington Post was first to report the news.
It remains unclear the exact details of the call.
(MORE: Trump denies news report that ‘promise’ he made to foreign leader prompted complaint)
DNI Inspector General Michael Atkinson in a Sep. 9 letter to the House Intelligence Committee said that the complaint rose to a level of “urgent concern” and “appeared credible” enough to warrant the notification of Congress.
The DNI’s general counsel and the Department of Justice, however, has disputed that characterization of the complaint, resulting in a constitutional showdown between members of Congress and the Trump administration regarding matters of potentially privileged material.

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The “Huckster” continues, cannot stop fabricating even after leaving Government service(?). MA>

Lee Moran,HuffPost 2 hours 36 minutes ago

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, in her new role as a contributor to the Fox network, said media organizations should remove opinion from the news and Twitter users inevitably balked at the irony of her demand.
“I think all of the media really needs to take a good hard look at how they put the news out,” Huckabee Sanders said on Wednesday’s broadcast of Fox Business’ “Varney & Co.” during a discussion centered on the criticism leveled at The New York Times over its report on a new sexual misconduct allegation against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.
“It’s gotten so much where there’s no process, there’s no accountability, no check and balance,” added the former Trump aide, whose tenure in the White House was characterized by her lying on behalf of the president.
“I think that we have to start taking so much of the opinion out of the news,” said Huckabee Sanders. “It’s a good news story if you can read it and you have no idea which side the journalist is on and it’s very hard to find that. There’s a big difference between commentators and news and we have blended those so that there is no difference anymore and we’ve got to go back where those are separate.” Huckabee Sanders then admitted that her current focus is on helping Trump win reelection in 2020.

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Bolton appears to be more rational than TOTUS, could it be that his actions during his White House tenure were dictated by TOTUS? MA.

By Daniel Lippman 2 hrs ago

John Bolton, President Donald Trump’s fired national security adviser, harshly criticized Trump’s foreign policy on Wednesday at a private lunch, saying that inviting the Taliban to Camp David sent a “terrible signal” and that it was “disrespectful” to the victims of 9/11 because the Taliban had harbored al Qaeda.
Bolton also said that any negotiations with North Korea and Iran were “doomed to failure,” according to two attendees.
All the North Koreans and Iranians want to do is negotiate for relief from sanctions to support their economies, said Bolton, who was speaking before guests invited by the Gatestone Institute, a conservative think tank.
“He ripped Trump, without using his name, several times,” said one attendee. Bolton didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.
Bolton also said more than once that Trump’s failure to respond to the Iranian attack on an American drone earlier this summer set the stage for the Islamic Republic’s aggression in recent months.
At one point, Bolton, a previous chairman of Gatestone, suggested that had the U.S. retaliated for the drone shootdown, Iran might not have damaged the Saudi oil fields.
Bolton called the alleged attack on Saudi Arabia, which U.S. and Saudi officials have blamed on Iran, “an act of war” by anyone’s definition.
The former national security adviser’s comments come on the same day Trump named his successor, hostage negotiator Robert C. O’Brien.
Speaking on an airport tarmac in Los Angeles, Trump introduced his new top foreign policy aide as “highly respected” and hailed their “good chemistry.” The remarks indicated that in O’Brien, Trump sees a more compatible adviser than Bolton, whose disagreements with the president and clashes with other senior officials often spilled into public view.
After the attack in June, Trump was poised to launch a military response against the Iranians — strongly urged by Bolton — but pulled back after Fox News host Tucker Carlson and others warned him that it was a bad idea.
During Wednesday’s luncheon, Bolton said the planned response had gone through the full process and everybody in the White House had agreed on the retaliatory strike.
But “a high authority, at the very last minute,” without telling anyone, decided not to do it, Bolton complained.
On Wednesday afternoon, Trump pushed back strongly.
“Well, I was critical of John Bolton for getting us involved with a lot of other people in the Middle East,” he told reporters during a visit to the U.S.-Mexico border south of San Diego. “We’ve spent $7.5 trillion in the Middle East and you ought to ask a lot of people about that.“
“John was not able to work with anybody, and a lot of people disagreed with his ideas,” Trump added. “A lot of people were very critical that I brought him on in the first place because of the fact that he was so in favor of going into the Middle East, and he got stuck in quicksand and we became policemen for the Middle East. It’s ridiculous.“
Bolton spoke to around 60 Gatestone donors at the exclusive restaurant Le Bernardin in Manhattan. Attendees included noted lawyer Alan Dershowitz and his wife Carolyn, former attorney general Michael Mukasey, Newsmax CEO Chris Ruddy, First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams, former Fox Business Network host John Stossel, former New York Lt. Gov. Betsy McCaughey and New York billionaire John Catsimadis.
Billionaire Rebekah Mercer introduced Bolton as “the best national security adviser our country could have hoped for,” garnering her very loud applause. Bolton had been scheduled to speak to the group before Trump fired him.
In his talk and the Q&A session that followed, Bolton took attendees through a number of global issues.
On Afghanistan, another frequent subject of disagreement with the president, Bolton said that the U.S. should not have pursued a peace deal with the Taliban.
Instead, he said, the U.S. should keep 8,600 troops in Afghanistan with intelligence support and other support elements. He called the proposed deal that was on the table similar to the agreement the Taliban offered the U.S. after 9/11, but said “it doesn’t make any sense.”
More than once, Bolton said, Israel would “sooner or later” see a new government, even though he personally liked Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
On Venezuela, a focus of his short White House tenure, Bolton claimed there were 20,000 to 25,000 Cuban troops in the South American country. The day they left, he predicted, the Nicholas Maduro regime would fall by midnight.
He also said that if British Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn were to become prime minister, it would be “fatal to the special relationship” between the U.S. and Britain.
During the Q&A session, Dershowitz told the crowd that it was “a national disaster” that Bolton had been booted from the White House, to what the attendee described as “thunderous applause.”
Caitlin Oprysko contributed to this report.
CORRECTION: John Stossel is a former Fox Business Network host. An earlier version of this article misstated the network.

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