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“Late Term Abortion”

The Washington Post points out there is no precise medical or legal definition of “late-term,” and “many doctors and scientists avoid that language, calling it imprecise and misleading.”

The Daily Beast also notes that only 1.3 percent of abortions are performed after 21 weeks of gestation, and the idea that a woman can get an abortion moments before giving birth is “not how medical care works.”

The use of “dog whistles” aka “coded” labels has been common for many years but until recently has been out of the mainstream of conversation. The current administration aided by a neer do well Congress has brought these “coded” statements and words to common use. Along with this common usage the administration has trashed agreements put in place to prevent war and improve trade. Tariffs (taxes) put in place to offset the “tax” policy that was supposed to benefit everyday Americans and threats to bad actors who were in a state of containment with the approval of our now alienated allies. The administration has in a few years undermined our economy, foreign affairs and put us on an isolation footing all because of “dog whistles”.

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Apparently Pete Carroll is not as much a leader as a follower. MA

Frank Schwab

Yahoo Sports•June 3, 2020

On the surface, Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll’s words about Colin Kaepernick were complimentary and important.

Carroll talked about how much Kaepernick did during his peaceful protest over social inequality. He said “we owe a tremendous amount” to Kaepernick.

But apparently part of owing Kaepernick a tremendous amount didn’t include Carroll’s Seahawks giving Kaepernick a job — one he deserved in the NFL — when they had a chance.

Carroll’s words are a lot more empty when you consider how he and the Seahawks shunned Kaepernick, and due to those same actions Carroll praised this week, when he would have been a great fit for their football team.

Pete Carroll praises Colin Kaepernick

Carroll made a long, seemingly passionate comment about Kaepernick on The Ringer’s “Flying Coach” podcast.

“I think that there was a moment in time that a young man captured. He took a stand on something, figuratively took a knee, but he stood up for something he believed in — and what an extraordinary moment it was that he was willing to take,” Carroll said, via Nick Friedell of ESPN.com. “… But what happened from the process is it elevated awareness from people that just took everything away from what the statement was all about, and it just got tugged and pulled and ripped apart.

“And the whole mission of what the statement was, such a beautiful … it’s still the statement that we’re making right today. We’re not protecting our people. We’re not looking after one another. We’re not making the right choices. We’re not following the right process to bring people to justice when actions are taken. So I think it was a big sacrifice in the sense that a young man makes, but those are the courageous moments that some guys take.

“And we owe a tremendous amount to him for sure.”

Great, right? Well, in 2017 the Seahawks could have been the team to sign Kaepernick. They brought him in for a visit. They called him again in 2018. Maybe that would have avoided the NFL’s collusion fight against Kaepernick. But they passed and signed someone who had nowhere near the resume of Kaepernick.

It’s hard to take Carroll seriously after remembering that history.

Seahawks helped keep Kaepernick out of NFL

In 2017, the Seahawks had Kaepernick in for a visit. Knowing the amount of publicity that would come along with that, it’s not just a “kick the tires” visit. Seattle had interest. But it didn’t sign him. The Seahawks signed Austin Davis, who has 13 career touchdowns, 12 interceptions and hasn’t played in the NFL since some meaningless snaps for Seattle in 2017. It’s impossible to argue he was better than Kaepernick or even a better fit in the offense behind starter Russell Wilson. Something changed the Seahawks’ mind between Kaepernick’s visit and signing Davis, and perhaps we’ll never know the full story. Carroll used the excuse that Kaepernick “is a starter in this league, you know. And we have a starter,” which makes no sense because teams are theoretically better with starting-caliber players — not Austin Davis — backing up their clear starter.

Then in 2018, ESPN reported the Seahawks contacted Kaepernick about another visit, but that was called off when Kaepernick would not promise the team he wouldn’t kneel during the anthem.

So when Carroll says Kaepernick’s demonstration was “beautiful” and a “big sacrifice” and “courageous moments,” remember that in 2018 the Seahawks called off a free-agent visit when Kaepernick wouldn’t promise to not kneel again. Beautiful, just not on the Seahawks’ field apparently.

There will be a lot of statements made by athletes and coaches as protests continue over the fight for social justice following the death of George Floyd. Just remember that some of them aren’t backed up by actions and in some cases, completely contradict what they’ve done.

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Jun 2, 2020, 9:18  

Evelyn Hockstein/For The Washington Post

  • A fake antifa Twitter account that called for violence was actually run by a white nationalist group, according to a Twitter spokesperson.
  • The account, “@ANTIFA_US,” pretended to align with the Black Lives Matter movement and ongoing nationwide protests, and called for protesters to “move into residential areas… the white hoods…. and we take what’s ours.”
  • Twitter banned the account Monday for breaking its rules against platform manipulation, spam, and inciting violence.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A Twitter account that claimed to represent a national antifa organization and that urged protesters to loot “white” neighborhoods was actually run by white nationalist group Identity Evropa, according to a Twitter spokesperson.

The account, which posted under the handle “@ANTIFA_US,” falsely aligned itself with ongoing Black Lives Matter protests nationwide. One tweet that called for protesters to “move into residential areas” and “take what’s ours” was retweeted hundreds of times as of Sunday night.

The account was removed Monday for breaking Twitter’s rules against platform manipulation, spam, and inciting violence, NBC News first reported.

A Twitter spokesperson told Business Insider that this isn’t the first time that users linked to Identity Evropa have created fake or inflammatory accounts to spread “hateful content.” The @ANTIFA_US account was created by the same person who created those previously-identified Identity Evropa accounts, the spokesperson said.

The antifa movement is a loosely affiliated group of anti-fascism activists, but does not have a national organization, defined structure, or leader. President Donald Trump designated antifa as a terrorist organization Sunday and has blamed it for organizing the property destruction seen at some protests nationwide, but there’s little evidence of any such coordinated effort. Meanwhile, some white nationalists have advocated for the acceleration of conflict between protesters and police in order to spur race riots.

Twitter said it was continuing to monitor platform manipulation and posts inciting violence as nationwide protests continue.

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POLITICS 

 

The president used federal police to violently clear space for a photo-op as he threatened to invoke the Insurrection Act.

Speaking from the Rose Garden on Monday evening, Donald Trump issued an unprecedented threat from an American president: that he would send “thousands of heavily armed soldiers” into Washington, D.C., to quell protests and would follow by invoking the Insurrection Act to deploy the military into other U.S. cities if mass protests against police brutality continued.

As he spoke, federal law enforcement officials working alongside military police officers fired projectiles and tear gas upon American citizens protesting peacefully just yards from the White House so that the president could be photographed holding up a Bible in front of a nearby church.

Democrats and a former military official condemned the president’s surreal display of authoritarianism. Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-Va.) called Trump’s orders “the actions of a dictator.” Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), co-chair of the Progressive Caucus, said Trump was “unleashing authoritarian violence on our fellow Americans.” And retired Gen. Martin Dempsey, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declared on Twitter, “Our fellow citizens are not the enemy.”

Other members of Congress, including Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Reps. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.) and Val Demings (D-Fla.), likened Trump’s speech to fascism. Rep. Don Beyer (D-Va.) called his actions “naked authoritarianism.”

“He’s using the American military against the American people,” presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden tweeted. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), a recent contender for the nomination and a possible vice presidential selection, tweeted, “Lives and our democracy are in danger.”

Elected Republicans were mostly silent; a few suggested that Trump adjust his tone.

Twenty minutes before a 7 p.m. curfew in D.C. went into effect and moments after Attorney General William Barr observed the police line near the White House, federal law enforcement fired tear gas into a peaceful crowd as protesters raised their hands and chanted, “Don’t shoot.”

“It was absolutely out of nowhere,” Diane May, one of the protesters, told HuffPost. “No one was throwing anything. Everyone was in the space that was provided for us and they just started advancing on us.”

The violent attack on protesters was an apparent effort to clear the area in front of the White House so Trump could walk to St. John’s Episcopal Church to pose for a picture at the historic church, which was burned during unrest the previous evening. The president wanted to project a show of strength after The New York Times reported Sunday that he had retreated to a bunker in the White House that intended for use during terrorist attacks.

Bishop Mariann Budde, the Episcopal bishop for the Diocese of Washington, told a Washington Post reporter that she was “outraged” and that church officials were never told “they would be clearing with tear gas so they could use one of our churches as a prop.” On CNN, she said Trump’s message was “antithetical to the teachings of Jesus and everything that our churches stand for.”

“To think that people could have gotten seriously injured or even killed just for a pose by a church that didn’t even want him there is outrageous,” said May, 33.

Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser called the actions of federal police “shameful” and said they acted without provocation. An official in Arlington, Virginia, which was assisting with the police response, said they ordered Arlington Police out of the city, saying a mutual aid agreement was “abused to endanger their and others’ safety for a photo op.”

In the televised Rose Garden speech, after days of police violence against civilians protesting police killings of Black Americans, Trump threatened to invoke the 213-year-old Insurrection Act to deploy the military into cities. He encouraged cities and states to deploy the National Guard “in sufficient numbers that we dominate the streets.” In places where mayors and governors do not respond aggressively enough to quash protests, Trump said, “I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them.”

As Trump spoke, police officers used force in an attempt to suppress protests in major cities throughout the country, including New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, Seattle and Louisville, Kentucky. At least 40 cities imposed curfews, making it easier for police to arrest peaceful demonstrators on curfew violation charges.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper told governors on Monday to approach the protests like a battle against their citizens. “I think the sooner that you mass and dominate the battle space, the quicker this dissipates and we can get right back to the right normal,” Esper said in a White House call with governors, according to audio obtained by The Washington Post.

Trump’s threat to send heavily armed federal military personnel into American cities to enforce order against the wishes of their elected officials is of questionable legality. The Posse Comitatus Act limits the federal government from enforcing domestic policy with military personnel. The Insurrection Act only permits the president to federalize the National Guard and deploy other U.S. armed forces at the request of a state government or if a state government is incapable of protecting its citizens. It has only been invoked in a handful of cases, including to protect the Little Rock Nine in Arkansas in 1957 and in the midst of the 1992 Los Angeles uprising over acquittals in the Rodney King beating.

The American Civil Liberties Union’s Hina Shamsi called the plan “irresponsible and dangerous” and said that no “level-headed governor is asking for an even more militarized response to civilian protests against police brutality and systemic racism.”

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“President Trump is not a dictator and he doesn’t have the right to unilaterally deploy US military across American states,” tweeted New York State Attorney General Tish James.

Although that may legally be true, Barr has an extraordinarily wide view of executive power, and the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel has imposed few limits of Trump’s power, justifying many of his whims throughout his presidency.

President Donald Trump posed for a photo with a Bible in front of a church damaged in the protests after federal law enforcem

President Donald Trump posed for a photo with a Bible in front of a church damaged in the protests after federal law enforcement officials used tear gas to remove protesters from the area.

The president’s threats follow a coordinated effort by the federal government to inaccurately characterize a nationwide grassroots protest movement against police brutality as an insidious effort by domestic terrorists to destroy the country.

Trump tweeted Sunday that he would label antifa, a term that applies to loosely organized groups of anti-fascists, as a domestic terrorism organization. Although current law does not allow the federal government to prosecute members of any domestic group the way it treats foreign terrorist groups, like al Qaeda, the proclamation is likely to encourage prosecutors to pursue aggressive charges designed to maximize prison sentences against protesters.

“As we speak, I am dispatching thousands and thousands of heavily armed soldiers, military personnel and law enforcement officers to stop the rioting, looting, vandalism, assaults, and the wanton destruction of property,” Trump said Monday in the Rose Garden. “Organizers of this terror,” Trump warned, will “face severe criminal penalties and lengthy sentences in jail.”

Reading from a teleprompter, Trump said at the White House that he was “rightly sickened” by the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died after a police officer in Minneapolis used his knee to pin him down by his neck for eight minutes, despite Floyd being unarmed and handcuffed, and disregarding his pleas that he could not breathe.

Trump’s speech did not include a single mention of excessive use of force by police. Law enforcement officers throughout the country were recorded on video over the weekend driving vehicles through crowds of people, beating nonviolent demonstrations with batons and hitting protesters and journalists at close range with tear gas and rubber bullets — even firing upon people sitting on their own porch.

The president said Monday that he supported peaceful protests, even as federal law enforcement fired tear gas, pepper balls and flash-bang grenades at nonviolent protesters just outside the White House. He claimed without evidence that peaceful protests had been infiltrated by “professional anarchists, violent mobs, arsonists, looters, rioters, antifa and others.”

“These are not acts of peaceful protest. These are acts of domestic terror,” Trump added, detailing misleading and sometimes exaggerated examples of property destruction and violence that he linked to the protesters. “I am mobilizing all available federal resources — civilian and military — to stop the rioting and looting, end the destruction and arson, and to protect the rights of law-abiding Americans, including your Second Amendment rights.”

Cable news networks broadcast Trump’s speech in a split-screen alongside footage of law enforcement officers firing at protesters as they tried to retreat. The sound of exploding flash grenades could be heard in the background as Trump described himself an “ally of peaceful protesters.”

Haley Miller contributed reporting. 

The president used federal police to violently clear space for a photo-op as he threatened to invoke the Insurrection Act.

Speaking from the Rose Garden on Monday evening, Donald Trump issued an unprecedented threat from an American president: that he would send “thousands of heavily armed soldiers” into Washington, D.C., to quell protests and would follow by invoking the Insurrection Act to deploy the military into other U.S. cities if mass protests against police brutality continued.

As he spoke, federal law enforcement officials working alongside military police officers fired projectiles and tear gas upon American citizens protesting peacefully just yards from the White House so that the president could be photographed holding up a Bible in front of a nearby church.

Democrats and a former military official condemned the president’s surreal display of authoritarianism. Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-Va.) called Trump’s orders “the actions of a dictator.” Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), co-chair of the Progressive Caucus, said Trump was “unleashing authoritarian violence on our fellow Americans.” And retired Gen. Martin Dempsey, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declared on Twitter, “Our fellow citizens are not the enemy.”

Other members of Congress, including Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Reps. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.) and Val Demings (D-Fla.), likened Trump’s speech to fascism. Rep. Don Beyer (D-Va.) called his actions “naked authoritarianism.”

“He’s using the American military against the American people,” presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden tweeted. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), a recent contender for the nomination and a possible vice presidential selection, tweeted, “Lives and our democracy are in danger.”

Elected Republicans were mostly silent; a few suggested that Trump adjust his tone.

Twenty minutes before a 7 p.m. curfew in D.C. went into effect and moments after Attorney General William Barr observed the police line near the White House, federal law enforcement fired tear gas into a peaceful crowd as protesters raised their hands and chanted, “Don’t shoot.”

“It was absolutely out of nowhere,” Diane May, one of the protesters, told HuffPost. “No one was throwing anything. Everyone was in the space that was provided for us and they just started advancing on us.”

The violent attack on protesters was an apparent effort to clear the area in front of the White House so Trump could walk to St. John’s Episcopal Church to pose for a picture at the historic church, which was burned during unrest the previous evening. The president wanted to project a show of strength after The New York Times reported Sunday that he had retreated to a bunker in the White House that intended for use during terrorist attacks.

Bishop Mariann Budde, the Episcopal bishop for the Diocese of Washington, told a Washington Post reporter that she was “outraged” and that church officials were never told “they would be clearing with tear gas so they could use one of our churches as a prop.” On CNN, she said Trump’s message was “antithetical to the teachings of Jesus and everything that our churches stand for.”

“To think that people could have gotten seriously injured or even killed just for a pose by a church that didn’t even want him there is outrageous,” said May, 33.

Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser called the actions of federal police “shameful” and said they acted without provocation. An official in Arlington, Virginia, which was assisting with the police response, said they ordered Arlington Police out of the city, saying a mutual aid agreement was “abused to endanger their and others’ safety for a photo op.”

In the televised Rose Garden speech, after days of police violence against civilians protesting police killings of Black Americans, Trump threatened to invoke the 213-year-old Insurrection Act to deploy the military into cities. He encouraged cities and states to deploy the National Guard “in sufficient numbers that we dominate the streets.” In places where mayors and governors do not respond aggressively enough to quash protests, Trump said, “I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them.”

As Trump spoke, police officers used force in an attempt to suppress protests in major cities throughout the country, including New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, Seattle and Louisville, Kentucky. At least 40 cities imposed curfews, making it easier for police to arrest peaceful demonstrators on curfew violation charges.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper told governors on Monday to approach the protests like a battle against their citizens. “I think the sooner that you mass and dominate the battle space, the quicker this dissipates and we can get right back to the right normal,” Esper said in a White House call with governors, according to audio obtained by The Washington Post.

Trump’s threat to send heavily armed federal military personnel into American cities to enforce order against the wishes of their elected officials is of questionable legality. The Posse Comitatus Act limits the federal government from enforcing domestic policy with military personnel. The Insurrection Act only permits the president to federalize the National Guard and deploy other U.S. armed forces at the request of a state government or if a state government is incapable of protecting its citizens. It has only been invoked in a handful of cases, including to protect the Little Rock Nine in Arkansas in 1957 and in the midst of the 1992 Los Angeles uprising over acquittals in the Rodney King beating.

The American Civil Liberties Union’s Hina Shamsi called the plan “irresponsible and dangerous” and said that no “level-headed governor is asking for an even more militarized response to civilian protests against police brutality and systemic racism.”

“President Trump is not a dictator and he doesn’t have the right to unilaterally deploy US military across American states,” tweeted New York State Attorney General Tish James.

Although that may legally be true, Barr has an extraordinarily wide view of executive power, and the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel has imposed few limits of Trump’s power, justifying many of his whims throughout his presidency.

President Donald Trump posed for a photo with a Bible in front of a church damaged in the protests after federal law enforcem

President Donald Trump posed for a photo with a Bible in front of a church damaged in the protests after federal law enforcement officials used tear gas to remove protesters from the area.

The president’s threats follow a coordinated effort by the federal government to inaccurately characterize a nationwide grassroots protest movement against police brutality as an insidious effort by domestic terrorists to destroy the country.

Trump tweeted Sunday that he would label antifa, a term that applies to loosely organized groups of anti-fascists, as a domestic terrorism organization. Although current law does not allow the federal government to prosecute members of any domestic group the way it treats foreign terrorist groups, like al Qaeda, the proclamation is likely to encourage prosecutors to pursue aggressive charges designed to maximize prison sentences against protesters.

“As we speak, I am dispatching thousands and thousands of heavily armed soldiers, military personnel and law enforcement officers to stop the rioting, looting, vandalism, assaults, and the wanton destruction of property,” Trump said Monday in the Rose Garden. “Organizers of this terror,” Trump warned, will “face severe criminal penalties and lengthy sentences in jail.”

Reading from a teleprompter, Trump said at the White House that he was “rightly sickened” by the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died after a police officer in Minneapolis used his knee to pin him down by his neck for eight minutes, despite Floyd being unarmed and handcuffed, and disregarding his pleas that he could not breathe.

Trump’s speech did not include a single mention of excessive use of force by police. Law enforcement officers throughout the country were recorded on video over the weekend driving vehicles through crowds of people, beating nonviolent demonstrations with batons and hitting protesters and journalists at close range with tear gas and rubber bullets — even firing upon people sitting on their own porch.

The president said Monday that he supported peaceful protests, even as federal law enforcement fired tear gas, pepper balls and flash-bang grenades at nonviolent protesters just outside the White House. He claimed without evidence that peaceful protests had been infiltrated by “professional anarchists, violent mobs, arsonists, looters, rioters, antifa and others.”

“These are not acts of peaceful protest. These are acts of domestic terror,” Trump added, detailing misleading and sometimes exaggerated examples of property destruction and violence that he linked to the protesters. “I am mobilizing all available federal resources — civilian and military — to stop the rioting and looting, end the destruction and arson, and to protect the rights of law-abiding Americans, including your Second Amendment rights.”

Cable news networks broadcast Trump’s speech in a split-screen alongside footage of law enforcement officers firing at protesters as they tried to retreat. The sound of exploding flash grenades could be heard in the background as Trump described himself an “ally of peaceful protesters.”

Haley Miller contributed reporting. 


Roxburgh’s goal was to develop students with good character and moral courage, young men that would be “acceptable at a dance and invaluable in a shipwreck.”

It is clear to me that goal was not achieved with our current administration and the Neer do well Congress that supports him. There is little blame to be placed on his voting supporters as they as many of us have been spoofed by our elected officials and the certain parts of the news media. Looking at the current chain of events from 2016 until now, we are, in the vernacular of many “deep Dodo”. This administration has created havoc around the world through withdrawal from climate and trade pacts, assessing tariffs on countries for no other reason than the thinly veiled racism. Pounding our southern neighbors through returning and requiring immigrants to remain there until their number is called ( often years at this point), building a wall that has no effect aside from encroaching on American land owners while at the same time cutting their  farms in half. There is no Rhyme or reason to this administration other than the aggrandizement of this President and his cohorts. All of the executive orders and barely legal actions of the administration abetted by the GOP members of Congress have served only to incite the divide created by a lackluster Congress and gleefully joined by TOTUS. This scam of a Presidency has brought shame on all United States citizens but is acknowledged only by the citizens who have the wherewithal to recognize and embrace the multi nationality that made America in spite of the hundreds of years of inequality. If you are afraid of folks who are different or do not look like you then you are in the wrong country as this has been the case for the existence of the United States. If you allow the status quo to continue we will always have inept and criminal representation in government.

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Michaela Greer

Michaela Greer

Associate Editor, Audience Engagement & Distribution at LinkedIn News

Generally, I try to keep my work and home life separate. But the reality is that for me, and many people like me, the issues within my community cannot be placed in a metaphorical box until the workday ends.

And this week has been especially difficult.

I’d like to preface this by saying that I don’t speak for an entire group; and I’d never want to. I am simply sharing my experience because I feel a duty to – even if I am speaking into a digital void. This post is also not related to my current role, so feel free to place it within the “a bit of personal news” pile.

This morning, I almost had the police called on me over a misunderstanding at the post office. In the moment, I was just angry. Once I left and my mind was able to run free — in all honesty, I broke down thinking of all the ways that situation could have played out.

As a person of faith, I thanked God that He placed a clerk on shift at the right time to intervene; and then I found a way to carry on with my day.

Come Monday, many persons in my community will report to work as usual. Some of us cry between meetings and during our breaks. Others keep our heads buried, consumed with projects, in an effort to stay too busy to see breaking news notifications jumping across our screens. We worry about our family members in other parts of the world. More of us numb. We hurt.

I’m fortunate enough to be a part of a team filled with caring allies and a manager who looks like me. I fully understand this is not the standard.

What’s happening in the U.S. is maddening. It’s even more upsetting that it continues to happen worldwide. However, time has proven that ignoring an issue doesn’t make it go away. We can argue about the methods of protesters — from a kneeling athlete to a rioting crowd — but it doesn’t change the fact that at the very core, something is truly broken.

I can admit that it would be foolish to think that things will change overnight, and I don’t expect anyone to have the solution Black people have been searching for for centuries. What I do ask, is that if you care for your coworkers or anyone who looks different to you, do or say something. The silence can be deafening.

Whether you choose to join in a protest, sign a petition, engage in an uncomfortable discussion, be an ally on the job, or simply check in on someone, have the guts and compassion to do it.

To my community, I ask that when non-Black persons speak out, don’t be so quick to condemn because you didn’t like their tone or method. Relish in the fact that you have an ally and educate. It takes a lot of courage to speak out and the fear of saying or doing the wrong thing can be crippling. We’re all doing the best we know how.

The only way forward is going to take an effort from all of us. We’ve come a long way, but we still have a trek ahead. So, as they say back home: walk good.

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Liz Roscher

San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich doesn’t pull his punches. You may not like what he has to say, but he’ll always tell you exactly what’s on his mind. And after nationwide protests against racial injustice and police brutality over the weekend, he had quite a lot on his mind.

Popovich spoke to The Nation’s Dave Zirin on Sunday, and he touched on several topics that are currently in the news. He began by talking about racism and police violence in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody, and how things continue to stay the same.

“The thing that strikes me is that we all see this police violence and racism and we’ve seen it all before but nothing changes. That’s why these protests have been so explosive. But without leadership and an understanding of what the problem is, there will never be change. And white Americans have avoided reckoning with this problem forever because it’s been our privilege to be able to avoid it. That also has to change.”

Then he moved on to leadership, lamenting the current resident of the White House, President Donald Trump.

“It’s unbelievable. If Trump had a brain, even if it was 99 percent cynical, he would come out and say something to unify people. But he doesn’t care about bringing people together. Even now. That’s how deranged he is. It’s all about him. It’s all about what benefits him personally. It’s never about the greater good. And that’s all he’s ever been.”

Spurs head coach Greg Popovich didn't hold back when talking about Donald Trump's response to the protests that have sprung up in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Spurs head coach Greg Popovich didn’t hold back when talking about Donald Trump’s response to the protests that have sprung up in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

Popovich has spoken about Trump before, but given everything that’s happened over the past week, this time he really went in.

“It’s so clear what needs to be done. We need a president to come out and say simply that ‘Black Lives Matter.’ Just say those three words. But he won’t and he can’t. He can’t because it’s more important to him to mollify the small group of followers who validate his insanity. But it’s more than just Trump. The system has to change. I’ll do whatever I can do to help because that’s what leaders do. But he can’t do anything to put us on a positive path because he’s not a leader.

“It’s like what Lindsay Graham and Ted Cruz used to say when they had the courage to say it: He’s unfit. But they have chosen instead to be invisible and obsequious in the face of this carnage. In the end what we have is a fool in place of a president, while the person who really runs the country, Senator Mitch McConnell, destroys the United States for generations to come. McConnell has destroyed and degraded our judicial system. He has tried to destroy heath care. He’s destroyed the environment. He’s the master and Trump’s the stooge, and what’s funny is that Trump doesn’t even know it. Trump’s always wanted to be part of the in-group, but McConnell is an in-group of one and Trump plays the fool.

“He’s not just divisive. He’s a destroyer. To be in his presence makes you die. He will eat you alive for his own purposes. I’m appalled that we have a leader who can’t say ‘Black Lives Matter.’ That’s why he hides in the White House basement. He is a coward. He creates a situation and runs away like a grade-schooler. Actually, I think it’s best to ignore him. There is nothing he can do to make this better because of who he is: a deranged idiot.”

As far as the protests that have sprung up across the country (and the world) since the death of George Floyd in police custody, Popovich let up on the gas pedal a little. He gave the protesters advice that he hopes will help them.

“[The protests] are very necessary, but they need to be organized better. It’s frustrating. When Dr. King did a protest, you knew when to show, when to come back the next day. But if you’re just organizing protests and everyone is coming and going in every direction, it doesn’t work that way. If it was nonviolent, they knew to be nonviolent, but this is muddled. More leadership would be very welcome so these incredible mass demonstrations can’t be used by people for other means. We can limit the bad, but only if things are organized better.”

Popovich has never shied away from making political statements and standing up for what he believes in. It’s comforting that even though the NBA is currently suspended due to COVID-19, Popovich hasn’t changed one bit.

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There were no governors hiding in the cellars of the State Houses, the weakness resides at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. TOTUS again placing the blame for his failure elsewhere MA.
Washington Post
Robert Costa, Seung Min Kim, Josh Dawsey

President Trump on Monday berated the nation’s governors on a conference call, describing them as “weak” in the face of growing racial unrest and urging them to try to “dominate” unruly protests, according to three people on the call who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the private conversation.

Trump also called on the governors to take back the streets and use force to confront protesters. He said if they did not, they would look like “fools,” alarming several governors on the call as they communicated privately, according to the officials.

“If you don’t dominate you’re wasting your time,” Trump said, according to a person on the call.

 

Trump told the governors that “you have to use the military” and “we have a wonderful military,” and he mused about the Occupy Wall Street movement and said it was a “disgrace” that was ended by governors and mayors being tough.

The president said that people arrested at the protests should serve 10-year prison sentences, according to another person familiar with the call.

“You’re allowed to fight back,” he said describing the situation as a “war.” “Now maybe my attorney general will stop me from saying that … but you are all big, tough, strong people and you are allowed to fight back.”

Many of the protests have featured violent clashes with the police, as well as the destruction of private property and looting.

Trump has remained mostly silent on the issue beyond his Twitter account, where he as at times sent out tweets that were more inflammatory than calming during the unrest.

His comments on the call drew immediate criticism from some governors, who charged he is inflaming tensions.

“The president repeatedly and viciously attacked governors, who are doing everything they can to keep the peace while fighting a once-in-a-generation global pandemic,” Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) said in a statement following the call. “The president’s dangerous comments should be gravely concerning to all Americans, because they send a clear signal that this administration is determined to sow the seeds of hatred and division, which I fear will only lead to more violence and destruction. We must reject this way of thinking.”

Trump and Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker (D) had a testy exchange on the call. Pritzker called out the president’s rhetoric. The president replied that he does not like Pritzker’s rhetoric, either, and that Pritzker mishandled his state’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, according to two people on the call.

Another person on the call said Trump praised Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz (D) and thanked Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper for his assistance.

When someone made a comment about the Minnesota response looking like an occupying force, Trump said that after the recent violence, “people wouldn’t have minded an occupying force.”

He added, according to a call participant, that the first phase of the response in Minneapolis was “weak and pathetic.” The National Guard phase was “domination … It couldn’t be any better. It was a beautiful thing to watch.”

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Monday afternoon that the primary focus of the call was encouraging the deployment of the National Guard at protests nationwide and said the president wanted to ensure that streets were “dominated with a police force and with a National Guard presence.”

Trump publicly addressed Floyd’s killing during remarks Saturday in Florida, where he was on hand to witness the launch of U.S. astronauts into space.

“Yesterday I spoke to George’s family and expressed the sorrow of our entire nation for their loss. I stand before you as a friend and ally to every American seeking justice and peace,” he said before moving on to address the successful rocket launch. “Healing, not hatred, justice, not chaos, are the mission at hand.”

Those remarks stood in contrast to many of his tweets, which were more belligerent in nature.

“I was inside, watched every move, and couldn’t have felt more safe,” the president tweeted Saturday morning about protests outside the White House on Friday night. “They let the ‘protesters’ scream & rant as much as they wanted, but whenever someone got too frisky or out of line, they would quickly come down on them, hard — didn’t know what hit them … Nobody came close to breaching the fence. If they had they would have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen.”

The protests grew so heated Friday night outside the White House that the Secret Service rushed the president to an underground bunker previously used during terrorist attacks, according to a person familiar with the situation who spoke on the condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of security for the president.

Early last month, Trump rooted on people protesting public health restrictions put in place by governors in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

He expressed support on May 1 for armed protesters who had stormed the Michigan Capitol, demanding the state lift coronavirus restrictions. Trump tweeted Friday that “these are very good people, but they are angry. They want their lives back again, safely!”

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Coward of the country did what cowards do-Hide! MA
By JONATHAN LEMIRE and ZEKE MILLER, Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) — Secret Service agents rushed President Donald Trump to a White House bunker on Friday night as hundreds of protesters gathered outside the executive mansion, some of them throwing rocks and tugging at police barricades.

President Donald Trump walks across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Saturday, May 30, 2020, after stepping off Marine One as he returns from Kennedy Space Center for the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)© Provided by Associated Press President Donald Trump walks across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Saturday, May 30, 2020, after stepping off Marine One as he returns from Kennedy Space Center for the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

 

Trump spent nearly an hour in the bunker, which was designed for use in emergencies like terrorist attacks, according to a Republican close to the White House who was not authorized to publicly discuss private matters and spoke on condition of anonymity. The account was confirmed by an administration official who also spoke on condition of anonymity.

The abrupt decision by the agents underscored the rattled mood inside the White House, where the chants from protesters in Lafayette Park could be heard all weekend and Secret Service agents and law enforcement officers struggled to contain the crowds.

Friday’s protests were triggered by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after he was pinned at the neck by a white Minneapolis police officer. The demonstrations in Washington turned violent and appeared to catch officers by surprise. They sparked one of the highest alerts on the White House complex since the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001 .

“The White House does not comment on security protocols and decisions,” said White House spokesman Judd Deere. The Secret Service said it does not discuss the means and methods of its protective operations. The president’s move to the bunker was first reported by The New York Times.

The president and his family have been shaken by the size and venom of the crowds, according to the Republican. It was not immediately clear if first lady Melania Trump and the couple’s 14-year-old son, Barron, joined the president in the bunker. Secret Service protocol would have called for all those under the agency’s protection to be in the underground shelter.

Trump has told advisers he worries about his safety, while both privately and publicly praising the work of the Secret Service.

Trump traveled to Florida on Saturday to view the first manned space launch from the U.S. in nearly a decade. He returned to a White House under virtual siege, with protesters — some violent — gathered just a few hundred yards away through much of the night.

Demonstrators returned Sunday afternoon, facing off against police at Lafayette Park into the evening.

Trump continued his effort to project strength, using a series of inflammatory tweets and delivering partisan attacks during a time of national crisis.

As cities burned night after night and images of violence dominated television coverage, Trump’s advisers discussed the prospect of an Oval Office address in an attempt to ease tensions. The notion was quickly scrapped for lack of policy proposals and the president’s own seeming disinterest in delivering a message of unity.

Trump did not appear in public on Sunday. Instead, a White House official who was not authorized to discuss the plans ahead of time said Trump was expected in the coming days to draw distinctions between the legitimate anger of peaceful protesters and the unacceptable actions of violent agitators.

On Sunday, Trump retweeted a message from a conservative commentator encouraging authorities to respond with greater force.

“This isn’t going to stop until the good guys are willing to use overwhelming force against the bad guys,” Buck Sexton wrote in a message amplified by the president.

In recent days security at the White House has been reinforced by the National Guard and additional personnel from the Secret Service and the U.S. Park Police.

On Sunday, the Justice Department deployed members of the U.S. Marshals Service and agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration to supplement National Guard troops outside the White House, according to a senior Justice Department official. The official could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

___

Lemire reported from New York. Associated Press writer Michael Balsamo contributed to this report.

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Stupid is as Stupid has always done in private and now it affects millions of people, while his administration continues to assault the American voters and their allies. MA.
Karla Adam- The Washington Post
President Donald Trump formally cuts ties with World Health Organization

LONDON —Global health experts and government officials joined in criticism Saturday over President Trump’s plans to cut ties with the World Health Organization and funnel U.S. money elsewhere.

In the remarks made in the Rose Garden on Friday, Trump blamed China for the covid-19 pandemic and accused Beijing of effectively controlling the WHO and pressuring it to “mislead the world.”

The United States is the single biggest financial contributor to the U.N. agency, and its exit will hit its budget even as it struggles with a global pandemic that has resulted in more than 364,000 deaths.

Trump said that the annual $400 million that the U.S. contributes to the organization will be redirected “to other worldwide and deserving urgent global public health needs” without giving specifics.

Jens Spahn, Germany’s health minister, tweeted in English on Saturday that Trump’s decision to sever ties with the organization was “a disappointing backlash for International Health.”

Spahn added that the WHO “needs reform” if it is to make “any difference for the future.” Germany will take over the rotating E.U. presidency in July and the minister said finding a way for the European Union to “take a leading role and engage more financially” with the U.N. agency would be prioritized.

South Africa’s health minister, Zweli Mkhize, called Trump’s move “unfortunate.”

“Certainly, when faced with a serious pandemic, you want all nations in the world to be particularly focused … on one common enemy,” he told reporters, according to the Associated Press.

A spokesman for the British government said the WHO had an “important role to play in leading the international health response” to the pandemic. “We have no plans to withdraw our funding,” the statement said.

The European Union urged Trump to reconsider.

In a joint statement, E.U. Commission president Ursula von der Leyen and foreign affairs chief Josep Borrell said that “as the world continues to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, the main task for everyone is to save lives and contain and mitigate this pandemic.”

“Now is the time for enhanced cooperation and common solutions,” the statement added. “Actions that weaken international results must be avoided. We urge the U.S. to reconsider its announced decision.”

A number of scientists and global health experts also stepped forward to voice their support for the organization.

In Australia, Peter Doherty, the founder of the Doherty Institute, whose modeling has played a role in the government’s response to the crisis, tweeted that the WHO is “central to the global fight against COVID-19.” He added that the “leadership has seemed overcautious in some of its statements,” but added that “much of the real, essential work of the WHO” goes on at lower, professional levels.

Gail Carson, director of network development at the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium, warned that a pandemic was “not the time” to make health political.

Richard Horton, the editor of the Britain-based Lancet medical journal, which has not shied away in its criticism of Trump’s handling of the crisis, wrote: “We give our 100% support to the World Health Organization at this time of crisis.”

“The U.S. government has gone rogue at a time of humanitarian emergency,” he added

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POLITICS 

 

Trump Signs Social Media Executive Order

The president acted against social media companies after Twitter attached a fact-check label to two of his baseless claims.

The move, which may expose social media companies to liability for what gets posted on their platforms, dramatically escalates a confrontation between Trump and his favored mode of communication, where the president can address his more than 80 million followers directly without relying on news conferences or the traditional media.

Trump and his backers claimed Twitter was suppressing free speech by labeling his tweets, which falsely claimed mail-in ballots would be “substantially fraudulent.” The president typically uses the platform to brag, attack rivals, bolster allies and spread falsehoods.

When a reporter asked at the signing why Trump didn’t simply stop using using the platform, the president retorted, “If we had fair press in this country, I would do that in a heartbeat.”

It wasn’t immediately clear how, if at all, the order can be enforced. The president cannot regulate tech companies without congressional approval and any challenge to their autonomy is sure to end up in court.

“Much as he might wish otherwise, Donald Trump is not the president of Twitter. This order, if issued, would be a blatant and unconstitutional threat to punish social media companies that displease the president,” the American Civil Liberties Union noted on Twitter.

“The president has no authority to rewrite a congressional statute with an executive order imposing a flawed interpretation of Section 230,” the ACLU continued, referring to the section of the Communications Decency Act that shields platforms from being held liable for what users publish on them.

“Ironically, Donald Trump is a big beneficiary of Section 230,” the legal nonprofit continued. “If platforms were not immune under the law, then they would not risk the legal liability that could come with hosting Trump’s lies, defamation, and threats.”

But Trump insisted Thursday that he would go as far as shutting down Twitter if his lawyers found a way. “I’d have to go through a legal process,” he said.

Social media companies have enjoyed legal protections for what gets posted on their platforms and have resisted tampering with even vile falsehoods, including Trump’s aspersions that MSNBC host Joe Scarborough committed murder.

Still, Twitter labeled two of Trump’s tweets with a fact-check warning for the first time on Tuesday after the president’s mail-in fraud claim. Many states have moved to expand vote-by-mail during the coronavirus pandemic, including California, which said this month all registered voters would be sent ballots for the general election.

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

There is NO WAY (ZERO!) that Mail-In Ballots will be anything less than substantially fraudulent. Mail boxes will be robbed, ballots will be forged & even illegally printed out & fraudulently signed. The Governor of California is sending Ballots to millions of people, anyone…..

83.5K people are talking about this

The Twitter addendum tells readers they can “get the facts” about mail-in ballots and directs them to news reports that debunk Trump’s claims.

The move, however, sparked a dramatic outburst from the Oval Office.

Twitter “is now interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election,” Trump wrote. He later said the social media giant was “completely stifling FREE SPEECH, and I, as President, will not allow it to happen!”

Trump doubled down on that criticism Thursday afternoon, tagging Twitter’s head of site integrity Yoel Roth in a separate tweet and deriding him as a “hater.” It’s the second time in as many days the White House has specifically targeted Roth. White House adviser Kellyanne Conway spelled out his Twitter handle on Fox News Wednesday, ominously predicting “he’s about to get a lot more followers.”

 

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he disagreed with Twitter’s policy in an interview with Fox News set to air Thursday.

“I just believe strongly that Facebook shouldn’t be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online,” Zuckerberg said. “I think in general, private companies probably shouldn’t be — especially these platform companies — shouldn’t be in the position of doing that.”

 

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey fired back at the criticism, saying the company would “continue to point out incorrect or disputed information about elections globally. And we will admit to and own any mistakes we make.”

“This does not make us an ‘arbiter of truth,’” Dorsey said. “Our intention is to connect the dots of conflicting statements and show the information in dispute so people can judge for themselves. More transparency from us is critical so folks can clearly see the why behind our actions.”

 

Lydia O’Connor and Ryan Grenoble contributed reporting.

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