Skip navigation


CHRISTINA A. CASSIDY and MEGHAN HOYER, Associated Press 7 hours ago

President Donald Trump’s decision to end a provision of the Affordable Care Act that was benefiting roughly 6 million Americans helps fulfill a campaign promise, but it also risks harming some of the very people who helped him win the presidency.
Nearly 70 percent of those benefiting from the so-called cost-sharing subsidies live in states Trump won last November, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. The number underscores the political risk for Trump and his party, which could end up owning the blame for increased costs and chaos in the insurance marketplace.
The subsidies are paid to insurers by the federal government to help lower consumers’ deductibles and co-pays. People who benefit will continue receiving the discounts because insurers are obligated by law to provide them. But to make up for the lost federal funding, health insurers will have to raise premiums substantially, potentially putting coverage out of reach for many consumers.
Some insurers may decide to bail out of markets altogether.
“I woke up, really, in horror,” said Alice Thompson, 62, an environmental consultant from the Milwaukee area who purchases insurance on Wisconsin’s federally run health insurance exchange.
Thompson, who spoke with reporters on a call organized by a health care advocacy group, said she expects to pay 30 percent to 50 percent more per year for her monthly premium, potentially more than her mortgage payment. Officials in Wisconsin, a state that went for a Republican presidential candidate for the first time in decades last fall, assumed the federal subsidy would end when they approved premium rate increases averaging 36 percent for the coming year.
An estimated 4 million people were benefiting from the cost-sharing payments in the 30 states Trump carried, according to an analysis of 2017 enrollment data from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Of the 10 states with the highest percentage of consumers benefiting from cost-sharing, all but one — Massachusetts — went for Trump.
Kentucky embraced former President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act under its last governor, a Democrat, and posted some of the largest gains in getting its residents insured. Its new governor, a Republican, favors the GOP stance to replace it with something else.
Roughly half of the estimated 71,000 Kentuckians buying health insurance on the federal exchange were benefiting from the cost-sharing subsidies Trump just ended. Despite the gains from Obama’s law, the state went for Trump last fall even as he vowed to repeal it.
Consumers such as Marsha Clark fear what will happen in the years ahead, as insurers raise premiums on everyone to make up for the end of the federal money that helped lower deductibles and co-pays.
“I’m stressed out about the insurance, stressed out about the overall economy, and I’m very stressed out about our president,” said Clark, a 61-year-old real estate broker who lives in a small town about an hour’s drive south of Louisville. She pays $1,108 a month for health insurance purchased on the exchange.
While she earns too much to benefit from the cost-sharing subsidy, she is worried that monthly premiums will rise so high in the future that it will make insurance unaffordable.
Sherry Riggs has a similar fear. The Fort Pierce, Florida, barber benefits from the deductible and co-pay discounts, as do more than 1 million other Floridians, the highest number of cost-sharing beneficiaries of any state.
She had bypass surgery following a heart attack last year and pays just $10 a visit to see her cardiologist and only a few dollars for the medications she takes twice a day.
Her monthly premium is heavily subsidized by the federal government, but she worries about the cost soaring in the future. Florida, another state that swung for Trump, has approved rate increases averaging 45 percent.
“Probably for some people it would be a death sentence,” she said. “I think it’s kind of a tragic decision on the president’s part. It scares me because I don’t think I’ll be able to afford it next year.”
Rates already were rising in the immediate aftermath of Trump’s decision. Insurance regulators in Arkansas, another state that went for Trump, approved premium increases on Friday ranging from 14 percent to nearly 25 percent for plans offered through the insurance marketplace. Had federal cost-sharing been retained, the premiums would have risen by no more than 10 percent.
In Mississippi, another state Trump won, an estimated 80 percent of consumers who buy coverage on the insurance exchange benefit from the deductible and co-pay discounts, the highest percentage of any state. Premiums there will increase by 47 percent next year, after regulators assumed Trump would end the cost-sharing payments.
The National Association of Insurance Commissioners has estimated the loss of the subsidies would result in a 12 percent to 15 percent increase in premiums, while the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has put the figure at 20 percent. Experts say the political instability over Trump’s effort to undermine Obama’s health care law could prompt more insurers to leave markets, reducing competition and driving up prices.
Trump’s move concerned some Republicans, worried the party will be blamed for the effects on consumers and insurance markets.
“I think the president is ill-advised to take this course of action, because we, at the end of the day, will own this,” Republican Rep. Charlie Dent of Pennsylvania said Friday on CNN. “We, the Republican Party, will own this.”
Dent is not running for re-election.
In announcing his decision, Trump argued the subsidies were payouts to insurance companies, and the government could not legally continue to make them. The subsidies have been the subject of an ongoing legal battle because the health care law failed to include a congressional appropriation, which is required before federal money can be spent.
The subsidies will cost about $7 billion this year.
Many Republicans praised Trump’s action, saying Obama’s law has led to a spike in insurance costs for those who have to buy policies on the individual market.
Among them is Republican Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona, a state Trump won. An estimated 78,000 Arizonans were benefiting from the federal subsidies for deductibles and co-pays.
“While his actions do not take the place of real legislative repeal and revitalization of free-market health care, he is doing everything possible to save Americans from crippling health care costs and decreasing quality of care,” Biggs said.
___
Cassidy reported from Atlanta, Georgia. Hoyer, an AP data journalist, reported from Washington, D.C.
___
Associated Press writers Jeff Amy in Jackson, Mississippi; Scott Bauer in Madison, Wisconsin; Kelli Kennedy in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Philip Marcelo in Boston; and Kevin Vineys in Washington, D.C., contributed to this report.
___
Follow Cassidy on Twitter at http://twitter.com/AP_Christina and Hoyer at https://twitter.com/MeghanHoyer

Please Donate


Originally published on October 12, 2017 7:02 pm

Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Donald Trump is not letting go of his fight with the NFL. For the last few weeks, the president has criticized players who kneel in protest during the national anthem. He says they’re disrespecting the flag, the country and the military. While reporting for our podcast Embedded, we found out this was not Trump’s first fight over the American flag. In fact there’s a pattern to how the president uses talk of patriotism to his own advantage.
NPR’s Sonari Glinton and Embedded producer Tom Dreisbach will take it from here. We’ll start with Sonari.
SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: This story takes place in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif. It’s a small, fairly wealthy city of about 40,000 – politically conservative, but it’s that Sunbelt brand of conservative. RPV is kind of the gateway to Orange County and has one of the most beautiful stretches of California coastline that you can find.
TOM DREISBACH, BYLINE: And Donald Trump first came to town in 2002.
UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Mr. Trump, would you like to come up and sit on this side, please?
(APPLAUSE)
DREISBACH: He bought up a golf course that was in trouble. The 18th hole had literally fallen into the ocean in a landslide. And Trump promised to fix that course and make it even better.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We’re going to build something that I believe will be, in the end, one of the great courses anywhere in the world.
GLINTON: Trump was coming to the rescue, and a lot of people were excited, like Tom Long. He’s a former city councilman, and he’s a Democrat.
TOM LONG: You know, a hole fell into the ocean. The golf course is ruined. I didn’t think there was any realistic possibility of it recovering.
GLINTON: And then the way I – I mean, in this part of the story, (imitating bugle)…
LONG: Yes.
GLINTON: Here comes in…
LONG: In comes the white knight, or at least that’s I think what everyone felt at first.
DREISBACH: Then came the fights. In 2003, Trump sued the public school district. Now, the story’s a little complicated, but here’s the short version. The school district owns some land in the middle of the golf course, and they were supposed to start collecting rent on that land. Trump did not like the deal, so he sued. The two sides eventually settled. The school district got $5 million. Trump got the land. But Trump could not let it go.
GLINTON: Trump was especially angry with the school district’s lawyer. During the lawsuit, the attorney for the schools called Trump pompous and arrogant. And so at this big public meeting in 2005, in front of the entire city council, residents and the media, Trump brought up the lawsuit. Here is the former city councilman Tom Long.
LONG: Why Donald Trump decided to focus on that lawsuit, I don’t know. But what he did is he then commented that the school board’s attorney, Milan Smith, was an [expletive].
GLINTON: Let’s just say the future president called him a two-syllable word which starts with the letter A.
DREISBACH: This was reported in the local paper and confirmed to us by three people who were there. And just some more background on this lawyer, Milan Smith – he was really well-respected, so well-respected in fact that later he was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
GLINTON: And that confirmation vote was unanimous. That court rules on some of the really important issues for the Trump administration. Earlier this year, they blocked President Trump’s travel ban for several majority Muslim countries.
DREISBACH: By the way, we asked both the Trump Organization and the White House for comment on this story. Neither responded to our questions. Judge Milan Smith declined to comment.
GLINTON: Now, that incident put the people and the city on notice, but that fight with the school district was just the beginning.
MCEVERS: OK, so yeah, we’re taking a left on a road called…
DREISBACH: Trump National Drive.
MCEVERS: Trump National Drive.
DREISBACH: So we drove out to the golf course with Kelly McEvers because when she’s not hosting this show, she also hosts Embedded.
MCEVERS: You’re looking out over this completely unobstructed, beautiful view of the ocean, and there is one thing that sticks up.
GLINTON: Oh, yeah. Look there.
DREISBACH: The American flag.
MCEVERS: A 70-foot flagpole.
GLINTON: That flagpole is the reason for another one of Donald Trump’s fights with the city of Rancho Palos Verdes. It starts in 2006. And by now, Trump has repaired and renovated the golf course, and it’s open to the public.
DREISBACH: And one day, essentially a flagpole just appears on the golf course.
GLINTON: And it’s not one of those things where everybody in a city doesn’t realize it’s there – right? – ’cause as you can see from every view on this side of the hill that flagpole is fairly prominent.
DREISBACH: But there’s a problem. Trump did not get a permit for that flagpole. And in Rancho Palos Verdes, people are very serious about their views of the ocean. That’s because if you’ve got an unobstructed view, your property values are a lot higher. So the city tells Trump, you need a permit, or you need to take out your flagpole.
GLINTON: And Donald Trump says – he doesn’t think you need a permit to put up the American flag. He writes in a letter to the city council, quote, “the American flag and all it stands for will not be taken down.” In other words, forget your permits. This is about patriotism.
DREISBACH: And this tactic actually starts to work. Some people are like, well, we can’t take down the American flag. It’s the American flag. Other people are like, no, Donald Trump has to follow the rules.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Thank you, your honor. We’re now moving on to…
DREISBACH: By the time it gets the city council, people are pretty upset.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Item number 10 is proposed solution to the unpermitted Trump flagpole and flag at Trump National…
DREISBACH: First you’ll hear Tom Long, and then you’ll hear Steve Wolowitz. He’s the second former city councilman who helps us tell this story. They both say they’ve gotten tons of angry letters from people.

LONG: At one end of the spectrum – someone telling me that how dare I even consider voting to take down the flag. And if I did do so, I should be taken out the next morning and shot.
STEVE WOLOWITZ: Then there was a very long letter that this is a litmus test of our own patriotism. It reminded me of shades of McCarthyism because we wouldn’t pass this writer’s test.
GLINTON: Now, that second city councilman, Steve Wolowitz, says at one point, he thought the whole fight was just an attention grab for Trump’s new golf course.

WOLOWITZ: Now, I have to offer congratulations to all of us for providing the very type of publicity that a real estate developer seeks.
GLINTON: In the end, the council votes.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Councilman Gardiner…
PETER GARDINER: Yes.
UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Councilman Clark…
LARRY CLARK: Yes.
GLINTON: The flagpole stays.
UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: The motion passes.
GLINTON: Trump gets his way, and Steve Wolowitz is left on the losing side. Now, that all happened in 2006, but Wolowitz still thinks about it.
WOLOWITZ: And to this day, people will stop me in the community, and they’ll say, weren’t you the guy who voted against the flag? And I’d take the time to explain to people that local laws, state laws and federal laws are there to protect us, and I can’t ignore those.
DREISBACH: Steve Wolowitz lived in Rancho Palos Verdes for four decades. He’s been a Republican his entire life. He’s worked with just about every community organization you can think of from the Chamber of Commerce to the Rotary. And for all eight years he served on the city council, he also dealt with Donald Trump.
GLINTON: He was there when Donald Trump insulted the school district’s lawyer, there for the flagpole. And he was around for the other fights Trump had with the city, like the hundred-million-dollar lawsuit Trump filed. So he got to know Donald Trump long before the presidential campaign. And we wanted to know what Steve Wolowitz thought on Election Day.
WOLOWITZ: Some of my friends and colleagues would hear and see everything I heard and saw, and they still supported him. I didn’t. That’s from – coming from a lifelong Republican, by the way.
GLINTON: But I wonder. As a lifelong Republican, as someone who – in this community for 40 years, how does that make you feel?
WOLOWITZ: I feel sad.
DREISBACH: In 2008, this city voted for John McCain. In 2012, they voted for Mitt Romney. Then in 2016, they had Donald Trump on the ballot, a man they knew. And they voted overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton. I’m Tom Dreisbach.
GLINTON: I’m Sonari Glinton. NPR News.

Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Please Donate


What kind of National representation is it when town hall meetings are filled with Hand picked attendees? TOTUS has used hand selected attendees in his town hall meetings. This does not represent the American people. These folks are not even a microcosm of America. These engineered meetings are similar to Hitler’s “town hall” meetings in the 1930’s. These meetings while not representative of America as a whole amount to a captive audience. Their  enthusiasm is similar to the audience on a game show vying for a chance to be seen or heard. This use of the population based on their usefulness to the speaker speaks to the lack of honesty by this President. Apparently it is easier to keep up a barrage of outrageous Tweets that serve only to take the focus off the real issues rather than making even the slightest attempt to Govern. It is clear that this Resident of the Whitehouse has no interest in truly Governing and uses bully tactics to affect a sense of it which excites his ever shrinking base. The executive orders issued are not really  laws but they have not been challenged by Congress as many of Obama’s were. It is easy to state forward progress while Tweeting about so many extraneous issues that have nothing to do with Governance. It is easy to excite people with lies as they can contain anything as long as people believe them. It is coincidental that Trump’s Grandfather was an immigrant and had his Grandson been President at that time what would have become of him? The worst part of this Presidency is that all actions thus far are based on fulfilling campaign promises at any cost rather than actually governing a country. A major issue is the ACA and it’s repeal which was supposed to allow for tax reform. To explain: The offered Health care changes or replacement was supposed make funding available to reform the tax code. Now the methodology  is go at these important issues in a piece by piece manner that if completed will cause  long term problems that will take years to fix.

Please Donate


Newton Minow | October 9, 2017 5:36 pm

Newton Minow appears on “Chicago Tonight” in an episode that aired July 23, 2015.
Newton Minow has been a member of the WTTW board since 1967 when he joined as chairman.
In this opinion piece, first published in the Washington Post, he writes: “For the sake of the United States of America and our values, we need your voices now.”

Dear Presidents Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama:
I am privileged to have known and worked with each of you and your administrations. I know how deeply you all love our country.
Our nation is blessed to have the five of you and your invaluable experience in the Oval Office — a total of 32 years with your steady hands on the nuclear codes. The time has come to use this unique asset to help the nation deal with our present situation.
Most of us now have very short attention spans. The news comes at us 24/7. One crisis immediately follows another, and we forget what has happened even one month ago. We need to keep reminding ourselves what has happened since President Trump took office:
• The president revealed highly classified information to foreign leaders for no apparent strategic purpose.
• He ignored ethical principles by not fully divesting from his businesses while in elected office.
• He waffled on condemning white-supremacist, Nazi and Ku Klux Klan protesters.
• He pardoned former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted of criminal contempt for violating a direct court order to stop racially profiling people.
• He fired FBI Director James B. Comey, who was supervising an investigation into the conduct of his presidential campaign.
• He persisted in condemning and seeking to discredit judges, science, the news media and, indeed, any source of authority that disagreed with him.
• He has insulted our allies abroad — as well as the leadership of his own party.
And then came two shocking and alarming warnings about the president’s stability. The first was from Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, who said the president “has not demonstrated he understands the character of this nation” and “has not yet been able to demonstrate the stability, nor some of the competence that he needs to demonstrate in order to be successful.”
Second, former director of national intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. said: “I really question his ability to — his fitness to — be in this office, and I also am beginning to wonder about his motivation for it.”
These red flags alerted us to be deeply concerned about our current president’s stability. News reports indicate that North Koreans, confused by contradictory messages from Trump and other members of his administration, are seeking out former American public officials to clarify American policy. Wars often start through confusion, miscalculation and failures of communication.
Millions of Americans are talking with friends and relatives and wondering what could happen, but there has been no serious, sustained public examination of the challenge to our nation.
That is why I believe that the five of you, working together, can and should supply the leadership our country is missing. Some of you have already spoken out against Trump’s actions. But together, as a bipartisan group, you could have a greater impact.
You all know that the Constitution and rule of law are only as good as the men and women who enforce them. You know from your time as president what it means to have your hands on the nuclear codes. And you know that the nation cannot risk having an unstable hand.
When our Constitution was enacted, a Philadelphian asked Benjamin Franklin, “What have you given us, a monarchy or a republic?” He replied, “A republic, if you can keep it.” Americans want to keep our republic, our Constitution and our way of life. People around the world, looking to our country for leadership, now worry about what is next.
I ask the five of you to combine your wisdom, your courage and your patriotism. You can speak out together against current abuses and reaffirm constitutional values. You can lead the nation to explore informal and formal next steps.
For the sake of the United States of America and our values, we need your voices now.

Newton N. Minow, senior counsel at the law firm Sidley Austin, was chairman of Public Broadcasting Service from 1978 to 1980 under President Carter and was appointed to presidential commissions and a Defense Department panel for the George H.W. Bush, Clinton and George W. Bush administrations. He also served as an informal adviser to President Obama, who awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Please Donate


Melanie Schmitz
Oct 10, 2017, 10:36 am
CREDIT: CBS This Morning
In an interview with CBS This Morning on Tuesday, former House Speaker and GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich called President Trump a “remarkable” and “historic” figure, comparing him to the seventh president of the United States, Andrew Jackson.
“I think Trump is a remarkable figure,” Gingrich said, responding to questions about the president veering off course and antagonizing his own party ahead of a major budget and tax reform battle. “I think he’s a historic figure, he’s certainly probably the biggest change agent since Andrew Jackson in the 1820s and 1830s.”
Despite the fact that it was intended to be complimentary, the Trump-Jackson comparison is unfortunate. Jackson, a historic figure with a number of military achievements under his belt, admittedly shares certain similarities with the current president, including his anti-establishment legacy and, as one onlooker at the time put it, the “rabble mob” he brought with him to the White House after his inauguration in 1829.
But the seventh president is also notorious for a number of troubling, inhumane reasons: Jackson was a slave-owner who offered rewards to anyone who gave escaped slaves especially cruel beatings. At the time of his death he owned approximately 150 slaves, though it’s been estimated that, over the course of his lifetime, he owned over 300.
Jackson is perhaps most famous for engineering one of the worst genocides in American history. A longtime proponent of removing native tribes who were taking up what he considered to be valuable land meant for white settlers, Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act in 1830, eventually forcing nearly 50,000 indigenous people off their lands and into the West. In the winter of 1838 alone, some 4,000 Native Americans died along the Trail of Tears.
In certain ways, the Trump-Jackson comparison seems depressingly fitting: since his own inauguration in January, Trump has become laser-focused on the removal of certain populations of people from the United States, including undocumented immigrants and their children, as well as on banning travelers and immigrants from several Muslim-majority nations. His antagonistic views toward social justice movements meant to draw attention to the deaths of minority populations, such as Black Lives Matter, has also drawn criticism. And as ThinkProgress’ Josh Israel pointed out in March, “Jackson, like Trump, preferred to ignore federal courts rather than enforce constitutional protections for all people.” Donald Trump ties himself to a president remembered for genocide. Trump traveled to Tennessee on Wednesday to visit the grave of Andrew Jackson. But, given Gingrich’s praise on Tuesday morning, it’s clear that many don’t view these comparisons negatively — quite the opposite, in fact.
Trump himself has touted those similarities in the past, using them to prop up his own legacy and play himself off as a change-maker. During a speech this past March at Jackson’s Nashville estate and plantation, The Hermitage, Trump noted, “It was during the revolution that Jackson first confronted and defied an arrogant elite. Does that sound familiar?”

Please Donate


The current administration along with outside interests have concocted a web of lies on everything they do and will do. There is no activity that is directed toward the good of the oft cited American People. For years now the political parties have underserved us and that under service allowed for an insidious group of people to take over the Presidency. This group has taken the tactic of another 1930’s dictator and that is tell lies until they become truth in the minds of the people. Once this conversion is complete the people will believe anything that is said. We now have the real possibility of war with a rogue nation and have hardened the lines of other countries. Our allies are not sure what we are doing and therefore have had to move ahead in world affairs without us. The administration has rolled back EPA protections that will spoil our air quality for years while producing no new jobs and will surely cause health issues. This Congress has all but suborned the rash actions of this administration with no thought of the what their duty to the country is. Considering the recent the weather related  events, there have been many statements of what will be done but  more attention on the activities on the Sports fields. It is as if the administration is promoting personal issues over National interests. This is merely more lies issued with smoke and mirrors. What we could become is a nation echoing 1930’s Europe.

Please Donate


Paying attention to events that occur requires background on the events. The Trump administration and the related news sources have blown the Kneeling and standing with arms linked way out of proportion in that the original protest had nothing to do with the flag or military. The media(?) and administration took the ball and ran in the opposite direction. The right (an oxymoron these days ) used this as a way to create another smokescreen and provide tweet fodder for the President. MA

Jaquelin Thomsen
12 hours ago
The Hill

An Indianapolis sports columnist accused Vice President Mike Pence of using a Colts game to stage a political event after Pence walked out of the game over football players kneeling during the national anthem. Gregg Doyel wrote in a column for the Indianapolis Star that Pence had staged the walk-out as the Colts played against the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday and that “Pence knew” players would be kneeling. “What, you think he didn’t know the 49ers would kneel on Sunday? Pence knew. The 49ers are the one franchise, the only franchise, that have had at least one player kneel before every game since Colin Kaepernick was the first to do it in the 2016 preseason,” Doyel wrote. “Kaepernick played for the 49ers, of course. “Doyel also noted that reporters following Pence were told to stay in a van outside the game “because Pence wouldn’t be there long.”
NBC News reporter Vaughn Hillyard, one of the pool reporters with Pence, tweeted that reporters were told to stay in a van outside the game because Pence “may depart the game early.”
The columnist also questioned how much in taxpayer money was spent on the political stunt.
“He traveled here with his usual contingent of aides and bodyguards, and he didn’t fly standby on Delta. Chew on that for just a minute,” Doyel wrote.
Pence tweeted Sunday that he left the game after seeing NFL players kneel during the anthem. President Trump later tweeted that he had asked Pence to leave the stadium “if any players kneeled, disrespecting our country.” Pence’s early departure came after Trump began attacking NFL players who kneel during the anthem last month. He said any player that kneels is a “son of a bitch” and said owners should fire any players that take part in the demonstration. Trump also called for people to walk out of NFL games if they saw any protesters kneeling.
Ann Coulter: ‘We May As Well Have An Attractive, Dignified’ President If No Border Wall

Please Donate


Our ability to make voting decisions is based on what we know to be factual, not all of us agree on everything but facts remain fact and will not change. Knowledge of issues is the key to voting the right people in office.MA

Ethan Wolff-Mann 16 hours ago

President Donald Trump unveiled his tax plan earlier this month. But despite tweets and extensive news coverage, the public holds a massive blind spot about the plan’s details, its potential effects on taxpayers and their own financial situation.
According to survey data of 1,570 adults compiled by data-driven marketing company Fluent, many people are still in the dark over proposals that could affect their finances and the economy significantly over the coming years should Trump’s tax plan become law.
Not everyone is expected to recite the details of the proposal, but the survey yielded a particularly surprising result: Only 53% of Americans had heard about Trump’s tax proposal. A sizeable 47% of survey respondents said they didn’t know anything about it.
Trump’s tax plan, broadly speaking, collapses the seven-bracket system currently employed to a three-bracket model, lowering the highest tax bracket to 35% from 39.6% and raising the lowest bracket to 12% from 10%. The middle brackets would be condensed to a 25%, though it’s not immediately clear which ones will be grouped with the highest and lowest or remain in the middle. In addition, Congress may add a fourth bracket for ultra-high earners, the cutoff and percentage has not been specified and will be up to them if they proceed. For businesses, the proposal also slashes the corporate tax to 20% from 35%. Besides the brackets and rate changes, the tax plan would double an individual’s standard deduction to $12,000 for individuals and $24,000 for joint-filers.
These changes are some of the largest to the tax system in decades, but 55% of the people who are familiar with the proposal have no idea about the proposal’s potential effects. For the rest of that same group, 20% think it will help them and 25% think it will hurt them.
Results show an expected partisan gap occurred between Trump supporters and non-Trump supports. Fifty-one percent of people who do not support Trump — Democrats, Republicans, and independents — view the changes as a massive tax cut for the wealthy. Fifty-four percent of Trump supporters, who the study found favor a single income-tax bracket for all, see it as a chance for economic stimulus, and 51% think it will help the middle class. Just 12% of those anti-Trumpers agree.
The survey also sought to reveal what people want their tax dollars spent on. For both Trump supporters and non-supporters, health care  and education led the way by a significant margin, though the ‘Make America Great Again’ crowd put military spending as a close third behind education. With the exception of military spending, priorities were almost identical similar in-line across party and Trump divides, with health care, education, military, infrastructure, justice, safety net-style programs, and foreign aid prioritized in that order.
Ethan Wolff-Mann is a writer at Yahoo Finance. Follow him on Twitter @ewolffmann. Confidential tip line: emann[at]oath[.com].


The Faux News organization with the aid of Geraldo Rivera has spoken about Puerto Rico’s problems. TOTUS stated to Faux that the “fake News” is reporting Fake news about what he said. How is news fake when TOTUS said these things live and on twitter? To lie is apparently the Trump way, he lies about lies and about things that are true that he said. How messy is the inside of this mans head? America is not the only country that can elect a person who lied to become elected. 1933 (approximately) a German citizen began his ascent to chancellor of his country. This ascent involved the persecution  of ethnic groups and groups who were considered anti-German and the causes of the economic woes of the times. This led to WWII in which millions of folks who were labelled as dangerous and responsible for German problems (job loss). The buildup to the war was done secretly creating jobs for many Germans so the reasons and  effects  on “non” Germans and others who were not so sold on the program of Germany first was devastating. Many were just outright killed at the hands of the Administration and citizens (neighbors, relatives). After turning on previous allies the world took notice but too late to do anything about it. All of this was done by disseminating “fake news” and outright lies to the people. The economic crisis made all of the fake news and lies plausible since the secret manufacturing had provided employment for so many. We do not have secret or overt manufacturing beyond what exists now but we do have fake news and lies daily which incites the baser elements of our society. If  citizens do not stand up and speak up we will have hard recovery from  this well of lies and deceit. In my opinion the “Tweeter In Chief” who really did not want the job is proving daily why he should not have it. Our do nothing Congress is allowing it while collecting money from us for the privilege. Our part in this is to actively contact your representative by all means possible.

Please Donate


In this year of 2017, we have access to information of all sorts and from all over the world in minutes if not seconds. In spite of this some of us chose to be stupid about events that shape or touch our lives. We have an administration that has or doesn’t want a clue as to the pain and suffering they are bringing down on us as citizens and voters. We allowed the election of a miscreant to the highest office in the land and now are crying about what he is doing to us. How did this come about? This event arrived on the heels of lies perpetrated for effect and having no basis in fact. People were and still are angry about job loss and  a slow economy, these issues were evident years ago but we still elected the same people to represent us in Congress for years. In continuing that practice of rote voting we allowed the rise of extremists on the right and left of center politics. These extreme factions arrived much like Adolph did on the heels of anger and need using lies to plant more seeds of discord against people who had little or nothing to do with the issues but were convenient scapegoats. Now we have an administration that is busily trying to return us to a less enlightened era where we are all separated into areas and factions. We need to disregard the nattering’s of politics and the current administration as their goal is  make us the country that no longer is welcoming and a world player. The effects of the changes being made by the Justice department and the assorted cabinet members will be felt almost immediately and long into the future if we keep silent. Step one : contact your representatives, do not be nice as they are not nice to you , step two: vote- every vote counts!, step Three: Get informed or WOKE! There is not 1 (one) single source for information so take the time look at several. Going back to a statement made by Benjamin Franklin: “We must indeed all hang together, or most assuredly we shall all hang separately.” – Benjamin Franklin

Please Donate

%d bloggers like this: