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Category Archives: Trumpedation


Hillary Clinton called  some of Trump’s supporters a “Basket of Deplorables” during the 2016 campaign.  She was wrong, the deplorables were and are the cadre of people in Trumps inner and inner, inner circle of the White house and by extension his cabinet secretaries. It has been shown that the Administration as described by TOTUS as the “best people” are really not the best as indicated by the revolving door that highlights this administration. This administration has shown by its actions that it will take someone else to make “America Great Again” as the current governors have neither the will or the way to maintain what was already in place. The next administration will spend the first year in correction mode to repair the damage done by this one and the neer do well Congress. Our responsibility as voters is to elect the best people and that means turning out the old guard who have held sway for too long. The 2 leaders in Congress along with their “gangs” have usurped the power of the people with an unending stream of lies, half truths and not so subtle innuendos on truth. It takes courage to vote against what you have thought was correct for so long but consider the source of that information (which has long been suspect). If you have been paying attention you will understand that  division was and is used to achieve the goals of an incompetent leader whose actions are solely for his personal benefit and ego. The track record of TOTUS is to lie and lie again with assured calm as pathological liars do. This nation cannot survive under an administration that cannot utter the truth and the truth is out there for all of us to see no matter what misinformation comes from D.C.

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Is it possible that we are seeing major cracks in the TOTUS administration radiating from TOTUS himself? It is pretty plain that this administration is as close to chaos as it can get before collapsing yet there is a diehard base that somehow believes this administration is doing great just because it (the administration) has fulfilled some of its goals in trade and public policy. This latest flap over a high court justice could well be another wedge in the ever lengthening fracture of this (mis)administration. Looking at the ongoing lie stream ala Goebbels, we see an underlying undoing of protections that affect all of us (education: tacit approval of onerous financial burdens by for profit schools, EPA rules for air and water quality and outrageous immigration rules and enforcement). Our overpaid seat fillers also called Congress have aided and abetted this mismanaged administration while  trying to convince us that they are working for us. Our task as voters is to replace as many of these neer do wells as possible in order to get us back on track as a United States.  If you are truly paying attention then you will see that this herd of humps have played the blame game rather than do the work they were hired to do. It is well to remember that there is blame on both sides of the political spectrum, so no one gets out unscathed.

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It is our job to get the right information and demand proper investigation when required. This latest debacle with the Senate Hearing on Judge Kavanaugh is a disgrace and shows up our “representatives” for the cowards that they are. So it is OK for Bill Cosby to be prosecuted for events from 20 -30 years ago but not for a potential High Court Judge? Can’t say if its Racism but a sexual miscreant is the same no matter what Race they are! Considering who we have sitting in the Oval office and possibly in Congress are we surprised? It is so important that we as voters recognize that we are the real power in government and  we must vote for the right people and voice our opinions whenever or wherever we can. We should not be taken in by political ads that attack or mislead, these are the instruments of dishonest people or factions no matter what high-sounding labels they give themselves. We are currently experiencing a hardly believable era of influential people in and out of Government whose sole objective is have things their way and convince us that their actions are good for us. This occurred in the 1930’s Germany and the 1950′ s America with Sen. Joe McCarthy. If we let The Senate and TOTUS get away with this, what’s next?

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We have expected our politicians to be true to their party’s basic line however not to the extent of fanaticism. Every voter has their own take on what is proper and correct however many times these opinions do not reflect the real effect of enacting or acting on these opinions for the country as a whole. In any give and take there no winners or losers  if done properly with that said why are we still electing and re electing the same people to misrepresent us in Congress? Our Congress to quote a statement From Wikipedia:
The phrase “speaks with a forked tongue” means to say one thing and mean another or, to be hypocritical, or act in a duplicitous manner. In the longstanding tradition of many Native American tribes, “speaking with a forked tongue” has meant lying, and a person was no longer considered worthy of trust, once he had been shown to “speak with a forked tongue”. This phrase was also adopted by Americans around the time of the Revolution, and may be found in abundant references from the early 19th century — often reporting on American officers who sought to convince the tribal leaders with whom they negotiated that they “spoke with a straight and not with a forked tongue” (as for example, President Andrew Jackson told the Creek Nation in 1829[16]) According to one 1859 account, the native proverb that the “white man spoke with a forked tongue” originated as a result of the French tactic of the 1690s, in their war with the Iroquois, of inviting their enemies to attend a Peace Conference, only to be slaughtered or captured.”

It should be clear that our Congress (save a few )do not have the interest of their constituents in mind unless it serves them personally (or make big donations to their campaigns). This current political era (1945-2016) has brought us “McCarthyism” where there was a Red or communist behind every door and ruining may live in the process, the Watergate scandal where a sitting President had to resign and the attempted impeachment of a sitting President for lying to Congress. Now we have a political a party that helped elect a person unfit to be President just to get their personal agendas passed while allowing their constituencies to go with little or no quality health care, air quality regulations to be rolled back and abetted in the passing of a predatory tax “reform” which gives nothing to the least of us. In the wings is a movement to tinker with your Social Security earnings to offset the  deficit created by the “tax Reform”. These are the issues that too many of us either do not know about or possibly care about but readily accept the blatant falsehoods emanating from the White House and Congress with impunity. We are currently in the middle of a struggle between correct governance and malfeasance in governance and we (voters) are the agents of change.

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Politics
Leon Panetta Says Trump’s ‘Failed’ North Korea Summit Was ‘Doomed’ From The Start
Hayley Miller, HuffPost 19 hours ago

Former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta on Sunday bashed President Donald Trump’s “failed” summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in June, calling it “doomed” from the beginning.
Panetta, who headed the Pentagon under President Barack Obama, said Trump never completed the necessary “preparatory work” ahead of the historic meeting.
“I’m very worried” about the current U.S. relationship with North Korea “because frankly, I think we have a failed summit on our hands right now,” Panetta said on ABC’s “This Week.”
The summit “was all about show,” he said. “It was about shaking hands, exchanging words. But the underlying work on process, on looking at nuclear weapons sites, on inspection regimes, on what should be done with sanctions ― all of the things that need to be done to produce some kind of peaceful solution ― were not done.”

Days before the June 11 summit in Singapore, Trump raised eyebrows when he told reporters that he didn’t need to “prepare very much” for it.
“It’s about attitude,” Trump said. “It’s about willingness to get things done.”
Trump emerged from the summit declaring it a great diplomatic success and he lavished praise on Kim ― something he has continued to do. But questions quickly surrounded Trump’s claim that North Korea had agreed to denuclearize, and U.S. relations with Pyongyang have appeared to sour in recent weeks.
North Korea experts reported shortly after the summit that satellite images proved the isolated country was continuing to develop their nuclear sites. Still, Trump tweeted several times in July that he believed North Korea would denuclearize.
“I have confidence that Kim Jong Un will honor the contract we signed &, even more importantly, our handshake,” Trump tweeted July 9.
But on Aug. 24, Trump tweeted that he had directed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to cancel a planned visit to North Korea amid the signs that its nuclear program remained intact. The president blamed China ― North Korea’s main ally and a target of Trump’s trade policies ― for helping block progress on the nuclear issue.
“I feel we are not making sufficient progress with respect to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” Trump tweeted. “Secretary Pompeo looks forward to going to North Korea in the near future, most likely after our Trading relationship with China is resolved.”
Panetta, turning to domestic political matters in his Sunday comments, urged Democratic lawmakers not to push for impeachment against Trump until special counsel Robert Mueller has completed his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.
“I think Bob Mueller’s report will ultimately determine whether or not there are going to be additional steps taken against the president,” Panetta said. ”[Democrats] ought not to get ahead of that report because that will be the key to determining what happens in the future.”

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TOTUS has mastered the craft of stating a non existing problem with current issues only to circle back later and address the issue again under the guise of “fixing it”. These issues were not broken until TOTUS said they were and his legion of followers who apparently do not read much yet follow his tweets and Faux news religiously accept the ruse as an accomplishment. Examples of the “TRUMP PLUMP”, NAFTA, The Paris Climate Agreement, The Iran Nuclear Agreement and the high profile meetings with North Korea and Russia respectively which gave those two leaders a higher profile and netted zilch for the United States. This is how 45 conducted his business and cannot abide not being the loudest voice in the room whether he is informed or not (mostly not). This President has packed his cabinet with adoring fans rather than the “smartest” people as he stated and we all are and will continue to suffer under those choices. What this administration amounts to is a National Platform for Trump which is used to promote his ego. This does not bode well for us.

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AUGUST 27, 2018
Kuttner on TAP
NAFTA: More Fake News from Trump. The White House threw together a rushed announcement of a “preliminary” agreement with Mexico on auto industry tariffs and perhaps wages. This was conjured up on short notice to divert attention from Trump’s rising legal woes and the appalled reaction from legislators of both parties to his refusal to keep the White House flag at half-staff to honor Senator John McCain, who passed away on August 25.
What makes the NAFTA announcement fake? First, an agreement to raise slightly the North American content (from 62.5 percent to 75 percent) required to qualify autos for tariff-free import into the U.S. has always been the low-hanging fruit of the deal. It’s all the other provisions—on the environment, on the ability of corporations to sue in special tribunals to block regulations, on farm and energy provisions, and on myriad others, that have and continue to be the sticking points.
Second, there is no revised NAFTA deal on autos without Canada, and it’s not clear that Canada will agree to such a partial deal. Third, there is no such thing as a preliminary agreement—either NAFTA is renegotiated or it isn’t.
This is complex stuff, but not all that complex. Yet most of the press coverage has taken the White House announcement at face value. Have a look at The New York Times.
Not addressed were Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs, or revisions in policies that compromise Mexico’s energy independence, a priority issue for Mexico’s new progressive president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador.
Besides diverting attention from other embarrassing Trump pratfalls, the NAFTA announcement was intended to peel off labor support. It didn’t work. Here is a statement just released from America’s leading industrial union officials:
We are aggressively engaged in pursuing an agreement that works for working people in all three countries, and we are not done yet. There is more work that needs to be done to deliver the needed, real solutions to NAFTA’s deeply ingrained flaws.
Any new deal must raise wages, ensure workers’ rights and freedoms, reduce outsourcing and put the interests of working families first in all three countries. And working people must be able to review the full and final text and have the confidence not only in the terms of the deal, but its implementation, monitoring and enforcement. We remain committed to working with the administration to get NAFTA right. Our members’ jobs depend on it. But, as always, the devil is in the details.
Richard Trumka, AFL-CIO President
Leo Gerard, United Steelworkers (USW) International President
Gary Jones, International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) President
Robert Martinez Jr., International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers International President
Chris Shelton, Communications Workers of America President
Don’t expect a real NAFTA breakthrough any time soon, and don’t fall for Fake Trump News. Now, back to the special counsel. That’s real. ~ ROBERT KUTTNER

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Nick Anderson for August 25, 2018 Comic Strip

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Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN 7 hrs ago
President Donald Trump is lashing out in all directions as the fallout from his summit with Vladimir Putin becomes ever more toxic, the Russia investigation grinds on with no end in sight, and his frustration boils over on a lack of progress on North Korea.
The tensions reached a new level Sunday night when the President issued an all-caps threat against Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, who had warned the US that war with Tehran would be the “mother of all wars.” Trump tweeted that Iran would “suffer consequences the likes of which few throughout history have ever suffered before” if its government again threatened the US, immediately ratcheting up tensions.
Exacerbating a sense of a White House under siege is the President’s full-out assault on his former lawyer Michael Cohen, who recorded a conversation with Trump about a payment to a former Playboy model who alleges she had an affair with the former real estate tycoon before he entered politics.

The controversies raging around the Oval Office underline how the President is increasingly taking control of his own defense and is willing to dictate high-risk political and legal strategies. But his incessant and often false attacks on special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation also give the impression of someone who fears its ultimate conclusions and is unsettled that his fate may be out of his hands.
The most surreal aspect of the latest lurches of this unparalleled presidency is the intensifying public debate over the once implausible idea that the President of the United States is compromised by a hostile foreign power.
But Trump is vehemently defending the summit in Helsinki, Finland, seven days ago as a great success, despite lingering mystery over what went on in his private one-on-one meeting with Putin and amid uproar over his invitation to the Russian leader for a second summit at the White House.
He is also facing increasing scrutiny about the results of another major summit: his encounter with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore last month, which ended with Trump declaring he had solved the isolated nation’s nuclear threat.
Since then, Pyongyang has returned to its characteristic strategy of diplomatic obfuscation and delay. The Washington Post reported Sunday that despite publicly talking up the success of the summit, Trump was fuming to aides in private that there had not been more dramatic steps forward in denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula.
CNN’s Kevin Liptak reported Sunday that according to a US official, the President had indeed registered frustration, but he was also convinced that North Korea’s continued suspension of nuclear and missile tests was a positive achievement.

No one can stop talking about the Putin summit

One week on from the Putin summit, no one can stop talking about it. And Trump’s defiance and failure to publicly rebuke the Russian leader in Finland over election interference is spurring unusual criticism from Republicans.
“The evidence is overwhelming,” South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy said on “Fox News Sunday.”
“It can be proven beyond any evidentiary burden that Russia is not our friend and they tried to attack us in 2016,” Gowdy said. “So the President either needs to rely on the people that he has chosen to advise him, or those advisers need to reevaluate whether or not they can serve in this administration. But the disconnect cannot continue. The evidence is overwhelming, and the President needs to say that and act like it.”
Still, on Sunday, Trump appeared to return to a previous position that Russia’s election interference was a story dreamed up by Democrats to excuse Hillary Clinton’s defeat — despite saying in a scripted statement last week that he held Putin personally responsible for it.
“So President Obama knew about Russia before the Election. Why didn’t he do something about it? Why didn’t he tell our campaign? Because it is all a big hoax, that’s why, and he thought Crooked Hillary was going to win!!!” Trump tweeted.
The intensifying saga of presidential misdirection, recriminations and accusations is a sure sign that the corrosive impact on American politics triggered by the Russian election intrigue is worsening. The odds of it ending in any manner that does not deepen political divides are lengthening by the day.
The question of why the President is acting in a way that often seems to further Russian goals — for example in his attacks on allied leaders and institutions like NATO — is driving growing concerns about his attitude toward Russia and explains why the controversy over the Helsinki summit is showing no signs of ebbing.
“I think there’s no ignoring the fact that for whatever reason, this President acts like he’s compromised,” Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said on ABC News’ “This Week.”
“There is simply no other way to explain why he would side with this Kremlin former KGB officer rather than his own intelligence agencies,” he said.
But Tom Bossert, the former White House homeland security adviser, said on the same show that suggestions that Trump was compromised by Russia were a “cheap shot.”
Contrasting Putin’s background as a former KGB agent who uses “penny-ante spy tactics” with Trump’s as a former businessman, Bossert said, “We spend our time trying to have productive meetings with foreign leaders. All the rest of this speculation and smoke is meant to undermine the President. It’s domestic partisan political concern mixed with some legitimate need to throw our intelligence forces against the prevention of spying and interfering in the United States.”
Whatever Trump’s motivation, there is also anxiety in Washington over his strategy of getting closer to Putin, even though most observers understand the necessity of communication between the world’s two top nuclear powers at a time of dangerously ruptured ties with Moscow.
“(Putin) is not interested in better relations with the United States,” Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida said on CNN’s “State of the Union,” implicitly contradicting Trump’s rationale for engaging the Russian leader. “I think he walked away from that a long time ago. He’s interested in gaining advantage at our expense and to his benefit. And as long as we go in with a very clear understanding, we can engage him all we want, but not under any illusion.”
Mystification over Trump’s invitation to the Russian leader is compounded by the astounding prospect that the meeting with Putin will be in Washington in the fall, around the time of midterm elections, which US intelligence agencies say are already being targeted by Russia.
There is also uncertainty about the long-term fate of Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats after his dumbfounded on-camera reaction at a security forum in Aspen, Colorado, on Thursday to the breaking news about the invitation to Putin.
Coats issued a remarkable statement on Saturday that is being interpreted as a bid to keep his job.
“My admittedly awkward response was in no way meant to be disrespectful or criticize the actions of the President,” Coats said.

Trump blasts Mueller and Cohen

While he remains consumed by his outreach to Putin, Trump is also fuming about Mueller’s investigation, apparently reasoning that he can use it to drum up partisan fury that will enthuse the base voters he needs to stave off a Democratic surge in the midterms.
“No Collusion, No Obstruction – but that doesn’t matter because the 13 Angry Democrats, who are only after Republicans and totally protecting Democrats, want this Witch Hunt to drag out to the November Election,” Trump tweeted on Saturday night. “Republicans better get smart fast and expose what they are doing!”
The President also accused the Justice Department and the FBI of misleading the courts, following the release of a previously classified warrant application to surveil former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page.
Trump tweeted that the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act documents “confirm with little doubt” that the Justice Department and FBI “misled the courts,” despite the fact that the document itself acted as legal justification for the FBI to obtain the 2016 warrant.
But Trump’s attacks on the special counsel pose their own questions.
To begin with, his prolonged assault on the investigation hardly suggests he has nothing to hide from Mueller. They also worsen the partisan imbroglio that plays directly into Putin’s desire to weaken American democracy.
While Trump’s ultra-sensitivity about Mueller looks suspicious, it could also be born out of an explosive reaction every time there is any question about the legitimacy of his election victory and his trademark insistence on hitting back harder anytime he feels he is unfairly attacked.
As if the Russia-related histrionics were not dramatic enough, there is also new intrigue about the case of Trump’s former lawyer Cohen, who is under federal investigation amid increasing concern among the President’s supporters that the attorney could turn on his former top client.
CNN reported on Friday that Trump’s lawyers waived attorney-client privilege on the President’s behalf regarding a secretly recorded conversation he had in September 2016 with Cohen in which they discussed a payment to ex-Playboy model Karen McDougal.
Lanny Davis, an attorney for Cohen, questioned whether the tape, first reported by The New York Times, supported the arguments of the President’s lawyers that there was no wrongdoing by the President.
But in a possible sign of concern that Cohen could chose to cooperate with prosecutors in a way that could deepen the President’s legal exposure, Trump lambasted Cohen in a tweet Saturday that mischaracterized the FBI’s raid on his home and office in April, which was executed on a court-approved warrant, amid a criminal investigation of Cohen by the US attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York.
“Inconceivable that the government would break into a lawyer’s office (early in the morning) – almost unheard of,” Trump wrote. “Even more inconceivable that a lawyer would tape a client – totally unheard of & perhaps illegal. The good news is that your favorite President did nothing wrong!”

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Meyerson on TAP
We know the good news; we’re experiencing the bad. As everyone has heard, the economy keeps roaring along; the recovery that began in late 2009 is the longest in modern memory; unemployment hovers around 4 percent; the sun rises in the East.
That’s the big picture. Closer to earth, at least here on the East Coast, it’s been raining on us so long we have to take news of the sunrises on faith.
Closer to earth, today’s Wall Street Journal reports, homes sales are declining, the boom notwithstanding. Though economists are predicting that the economy in the quarter just ended will have grown by 4 percent, home sales have declined for five of the past six months when compared to their totals one year ago.
A particular weakness in the home-buying market is millennials, whose rate of homeownership is well below that of previous generations when they were under 35. Apparently, when you saddle millennials with record levels of student debt and strip them of the kind of employment security their elders experienced, they don’t buy houses as their elders once did, either.
The decline in home sales is of a piece with the news that average hourly wages actually declined between June 2017 and June 2018—despite all the new jobs created, despite the unemployment rate continuing to fall.
What should be clear from all this—and this should have been clear for many years—is that low unemployment is a necessary but insufficient condition for broadly shared prosperity. To attain that kind of prosperity, where people start buying houses again, we need to make some fundamental changes to our economy—like changing labor law so workers can collectively bargain again, like raising the federal minimum wage, like raising taxes on capital and the rich so that the government can begin investing in public works that bring with them good-paying jobs, like raising the taxes on corporations that funnel all their profits to shareholders instead of paying their employees or investing in productive enterprises, like requiring corporations to give their employees a number of their board seats equal to that of shareholder representatives—like making our capitalism more social, and thereby more functional. Who knows? Maybe Americans will be able to buy homes again. ~ HAROLD MEYERSON

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