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I received this email and I am posting it because of the claim of factual claims, see my reply at the end.
This is all factually (and historically) correct – and verifiable if one would decide to do some research toward that end…
if you even go back further…..
in 732 AD the Muslim Army which was moving on Paris was defeated and turned back at Tours, France, by Charles Martell.
                   
…in 1571 AD the Muslim Army/ Navy was defeated by the Italians and Austrians as they tried to cross the Mediterranean to attack southern Europe in the Battle of Lapanto.                  
 
…in 1683 AD the Turkish Muslim Army, attacking Eastern Europe, was finally defeated in the Battle of Vienna by German and Polish Christian Armies.                        
 
…this crap has been going on for 1,400 years and half of these  politicians don’t even know it !!!
…if these battles had not been won we might be speaking Arabic and Christianity could be non – existent;
        
Judaism certainly would be… And let us not forget that Hitler was an admirer of Islam and that the Mufti of Jerusalem was Hitler’s guest in Berlin and raised Bosnian Muslim SS Divisions: the 13th and 21st Waffen SS Divisions who killed Jews, Russians, Gypsies, and any other “subhumans”.
       
Reflecting 
A lot of Americans have become so insulated from reality that they imagine that America can suffer defeat without any inconvenience to themselves. 
                
Pause a moment, reflect back. These events are actual events from history. They really happened!!!
Do you remember?
 1. In 1968, Bobby Kennedy was shot and killed by a Muslim male.    
   2. In 1972 at the Munich Olympics, athletes were kidnapped and massacred 
by Muslim males.
  3. In 1972 a Pan Am 747 was hijacked and eventually diverted to Cairo where a fuse was lit on final approach, it was blown up shortly after landing 
by Muslim males.
  4. In 1973 a Pan Am 707 was destroyed in Rome, with 33 people killed, when it was attacked with grenades 
by Muslim males.
   5. In 1979, the US embassy in Iran was taken over 
by Muslim males.
   6. During the 1980’s a number of Americans were kidnapped in Lebanon 
by Muslim males.
   7. In 1983, the US Marine barracks in Beirut was blown up 
by Muslim males.
   8. In 1985, the cruise ship Achille Lauro was hijacked and a 70 year old American passenger was murdered and thrown overboard in his wheelchair 
by Muslim males.
   9. In 1985, TWA flight 847 was hijacked at Athens , and a US Navy diver trying to rescue passengers was murdered 
by Muslim males.
   10. In 1988, Pan Am Flight 103 was bombed 
by Muslim males.
   11. In 1993 , the World Trade Center was bombed the first time 
by Muslim males.
   12. In 1998, the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were bombed 
by Muslim males.
   13. On 9/11/01, four airliners were hijacked; two were used as missiles to take down the World Trade Centers and of the remaining two, one crashed into the US Pentagon and the other was diverted and crashed by the passengers. Thousands of people were killed 
by Muslim males.
   14. In 2002, the United States fought a war in Afghanistan against 
Muslim males.
   15. In 2002, reporter Daniel Pearl was kidnapped and beheaded by—you guessed it was a— 
Muslim male.
   16. In 2013, Boston Marathon Bombing 4 Innocent people including a child killed, 264 injured by Muslim males.
           
           

        
As the writer of the award winning story ‘Forrest Gump’ so aptly put it, ‘Stupid Is As Stupid Does’. 
         

Today at 10:44 AM
Given that the information you sent me is factually correct, the context is not. True that Muslims have been fighting wars for centuries, they have all been led by extreme Muslims who murdered as many moderate Muslims as they have Christians. If the  facts given were pursued to their total conclusion you will find that there were as many Christian, pagan and other lesser known religious wars and uprisings as we now have the ability to know about due to mass communication. These “wars” are 90% the result of economic conditions exacerbated  and aggravated by charismatic extremist leaders who for lack of ordinary human kindness want unlimited power to advance their own personal agendas much like Charles Manson, our Current Congress, Hitler and the NRA. The ability to take snippets of information and extrapolate them into a theme is the same as those before us, with us and will come after us to capitalize on the misfortunes of others and use that to create the dissention and hate that abounds now. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to express this information-is this a great country or what?
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__._,_.___

Posted by: John Holladay <johnholladay@outlook.com>

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As I was standing in line at the local hardware store (not my choice but left to buy and take home my spouses plants), a conversation began between the standees while we waited,  one part was particularly interesting but short. One gentleman stated that we wait a lot and somehow the conversation got to Government (I have no idea how this thread started) making us do things. This gentlemen’s peeve at the moment was “being told to wear seat belts and that he proudly said I’ve been ticketed 3 times and still will not wear one (he is just lucky I guess). he also expounded on motorcycle helmets and how unsafe it is to wear them as you can’t hear or see to the side with them, therefore not wearing them is better. The next part of the conversation concerned health care: This standees stated “I don’t mind buying it but I just don’t like being told to do it”. This statement got me thinking “perhaps that is the problem: The government needs to stop telling us to do things and let us just do it or not”. With these thoughts in mind, what do you think the advertising industry and the media has been doing to us for years?

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Hi Mike,
The Koch brothers ought to share more of their wealth with their employees rather than trying to run the elections.  At least they could not change the Presidential election.
Attached is an essay in today’s Battle Creek Enquirer.  It is evident, I am a plug in on a slow day or a help when time off is needed.

The Tricksters of the Fable

 

Folks that blurt out just what they think wouldn’t be so bad if they thought.  Kim Hubbard

Getting students to analyze and discuss readings can be tough.  At a Midwestern university, a tale circulated about a professor who assigned a journal article at registration expecting students to be prepared to discuss it at the first class meeting.   He opened the class asking:  “What comments or questions do you have?”  No student wanted to be a first responder.  He waited a few minutes and then stuffed his copy in his briefcase and said, “Either you know it all and you don’t need me, or you are too dumb and I can’t help you.”  He left the room.  At the second class, all the students raised their hands.

I would never have tried this strategy because my next appearance would have been at the Dean’s office cosigning my dismissal.  But I did get upstaged trying to teach critical analysis with evening college students.  These students had rich backgrounds; they were older, work experienced, married, and settled down.  Some had been teenage hell raisers in high school and at home, but now they had matured and were ready to learn.  They suffered from the insecurities of mind rustiness and time pressure demands of family and work. I was a kinsman sharing similar experiences, being a tradesman by day and an instructor of English 101by night.

This required course consisted of several assigned essays with revisions and considerable readings.  I wanted them to think about the writers’ intents and not be afraid to lay out their views even when they differed from those of others.  My plan was to use a student role play to demonstrate the process.  Two weeks into the course, I selected two gregarious fellows:  a super market manager and an eight year Marine veteran and now a fork lift operator to assume discussant roles.  I gave them an Aesop’s fable a week in advance to analyze and encouraged them to think freely and not get personal if their interpretations differed. We would wing it and produce an erudite discussion for the class’s benefit.  But this how it went.

Instructor        Greetings students. I would like to use discussion as a means to learn from our readings.  We should examine their messages closely and think about what the writers are trying to teach us.   As a demonstration, I have asked two of your classmates to carry a discussion of the main idea and points of this fable.  Here is a version by Laurence Perrine.

Aesop tells the tale of a traveler who sought refuge with a Satyr on a bitter winter  night. On entering the Satyr’s lodging, he blew on his fingers, and was asked by the Satyr what he did it for.  “To warm them up,” he explained.  Later, on being served with a piping hot bowl of porridge, he blew also on it, and again was asked what he did it for.  “To cool it off,” he explained.  The Satyr thereupon thrust him out-of-doors, for he would have nothing to do with a man who could blow hot and cold with the same breath.  What’s up here?

Student 1         His credit card expired?

Instructor        No! No!

Student 2         He didn’t have a reservation?

Instructor        No! No!  Didn’t at least one of you discover; this is a paradox?

Student 2         A MD and a DO, hee, hee

Instructor        That’s terrible.  No! No!  A paradox is an apparent contradiction that is

nevertheless somehow true.  How can we explain the cold hands, warm breath, and hot porridge phenomena?

Student 1         Peas porridge hot, the

The Tricksters of the Fable

 

Folks that blurt out just what they think wouldn’t be so bad if they thought.  Kim Hubbard

Getting students to analyze and discuss readings can be tough.  At a Midwestern university, a tale circulated about a professor who assigned a journal article at registration expecting students to be prepared to discuss it at the first class meeting.   He opened the class asking:  “What comments or questions do you have?”  No student wanted to be a first responder.  He waited a few minutes and then stuffed his copy in his briefcase and said, “Either you know it all and you don’t need me, or you are too dumb and I can’t help you.”  He left the room.  At the second class, all the students raised their hands.

I would never have tried this strategy because my next appearance would have been at the Dean’s office cosigning my dismissal.  But I did get upstaged trying to teach critical analysis with evening college students.  These students had rich backgrounds; they were older, work experienced, married, and settled down.  Some had been teenage hell raisers in high school and at home, but now they had matured and were ready to learn.  They suffered from the insecurities of mind rustiness and time pressure demands of family and work. I was a kinsman sharing similar experiences, being a tradesman by day and an instructor of English 101by night.

This required course consisted of several assigned essays with revisions and considerable readings.  I wanted them to think about the writers’ intents and not be afraid to lay out their views even when they differed from those of others.  My plan was to use a student role play to demonstrate the process.  Two weeks into the course, I selected two gregarious fellows:  a super market manager and an eight year Marine veteran and now a fork lift operator to assume discussant roles.  I gave them an Aesop’s fable a week in advance to analyze and encouraged them to think freely and not get personal if their interpretations differed. We would wing it and produce an erudite discussion for the class’s benefit.  But this how it went.

Instructor        Greetings students. I would like to use discussion as a means to learn from our readings.  We should examine their messages closely and think about what the writers are trying to teach us.   As a demonstration, I have asked two of your classmates to carry a discussion of the main idea and points of this fable.  Here is a version by Laurence Perrine.

Aesop tells the tale of a traveler who sought refuge with a Satyr on a bitter winter  night. On entering the Satyr’s lodging, he blew on his fingers, and was asked by the Satyr what he did it for.  “To warm them up,” he explained.  Later, on being served with a piping hot bowl of porridge, he blew also on it, and again was asked what he did it for.  “To cool it off,” he explained.  The Satyr thereupon thrust him out of doors, for he would have nothing to do with a man who could blow hot and cold with the same breath.  What’s up here?

Student 1         His credit card expired?

Instructor        No! No!

Student 2         He didn’t have a reservation?

Instructor        No! No!  Didn’t at least one of you discover; this is a paradox?

Student 2         A MD and a DO, hee, hee

Instructor        That’s terrible.  No! No!  A paradox is an apparent contradiction that is

nevertheless somehow true.  How can we explain the cold hands, warm breath, and hot porridge phenomena?

Student 1         Peas porridge hot, thesea hands cold.  Peas porridge in the pot; the  traveler’s out in the cold.

Instructor        Cute. Real clownish. But what is the physics principle?

Student 1         Oh, you mean, what kind of tonic?

Instructor        Not physic, the pick-me-upper, but physics, the science of matter and energy kind!

Student 2         Nothing for me.  I already tried an elixir for my arthritis.

Instructor        Seriously—what did you learn from this?

Student 1         Better to go to Motel 5?

Instructor        No! No!

Student 2         Don’t drink the soup?

Instructor        No! No! What’s the explanation of the paradox?

Student 2         Blowing on the soup is ill-mannered?

Instructor        No! No!

Student 1         Hold the soup bowl to warm the hands?

Instructor        No! No!  Educated people know that a stream of air directed upon an object of different temperature will tend to bring that object closer to its own temperature.

Student 2         Wow!  That’s heavy stuff.  I don’t know if I can handle all this.

Student 1         Hot dang!  We may not learn a lot; but this discussion is fun.

Instructor        Maybe, discussion is not the best technique.  How did I ever pick these two bozos?  Perhaps, I should lecture next time.

Student 1         I don’t need lecturing.  I get it at home all the time.

Student 2         Have a heart Doc.  Most of my study has been through online and hands-on-experiences, much of which got me into a lot of trouble.

Well these fellows had tricked me into flouting the analytical principles I wanted to teach: tolerating divergent views, avoiding lecturing, and abstaining from personal attacks.  But it was a good lesson in reverse.  I apologized by means of this verse.

Most of us are quick to proclaim

That we’re fair minded people in the main.

But when the biases we are taught

Prevent our thinking as we ought

Our remarks can turn to some taunting refrains.

 

Martin Egelston lives in Battle Creek

Published in the Battle Creek Enquirer May 28, 2014

sea hands cold.  Peas porridge in the pot; the                                                traveler’s out in the cold.

Instructor        Cute. Real clownish. But what is the physics principle?

Student 1         Oh, you mean, what kind of tonic?

Instructor        Not physic, the pick-me-upper, but physics, the science of matter and energy kind!

Student 2         Nothing for me.  I already tried an elixir for my arthritis.

Instructor        Seriously—what did you learn from this?

Student 1         Better to go to Motel 5?

Instructor        No! No!

Student 2         Don’t drink the soup?

Instructor        No! No! What’s the explanation of the paradox?

Student 2         Blowing on the soup is ill-mannered?

Instructor        No! No!

Student 1         Hold the soup bowl to warm the hands?

Instructor        No! No!  Educated people know that a stream of air directed upon an object of different temperature will tend to bring that object closer to its own temperature.

Student 2         Wow!  That’s heavy stuff.  I don’t know if I can handle all this.

Student 1         Hot dang!  We may not learn a lot; but this discussion is fun.

Instructor        Maybe, discussion is not the best technique.  How did I ever pick these two bozos?  Perhaps, I should lecture next time.

Student 1         I don’t need lecturing.  I get it at home all the time.

Student 2         Have a heart Doc.  Most of my study has been through online and hands-on-experiences, much of which got me into a lot of trouble.

Well these fellows had tricked me into flouting the analytical principles I wanted to teach: tolerating divergent views, avoiding lecturing, and abstaining from personal attacks.  But it was a good lesson in reverse.  I apologized by means of this verse.

Most of us are quick to proclaim

That we’re fair minded people in the main.

But when the biases we are taught

Prevent our thinking as we ought

Our remarks can turn to some taunting refrains.

 

Martin Egelston lives in Battle Creek

Published in the Battle Creek Enquirer May 28, 2014

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18 Signs You’re With the Man
You Should Marry

Amy Odell & Lori Fradkin

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He’s your biggest fan (arguably next to your mom).

1. He always brags about you. If you get a promotion at work or even just win concert tickets he can’t resist telling everyone you hang out with before you even think to mention it. Because he’s your biggest fan (arguably next to your mom).

2. He makes sacrifices for you — and you’re happy to do the same for him. He’ll move cities to live with you if you get a new job or finish grad school. You’re happy to make the next move for one of his opportunities.

3. He shares the same values as you. You know you both want kids and expect to split the childcare equally. Or maybe you know you both want kids and he wants to take extended paternity leave. Maybe you’ve also agreed that you should each get 45 minutes to yourself to go to the gym every day or you plan to buy a home and move to the suburbs in five years. You know you’re on the same page with things that matter most to you because you’ve discussed them.

4. Even after years together he still does little chivalrous things for you. Like open doors for you or carry you to your doorstep when your feet hurt after wearing high heels all day and you just can’t bear to walk one more block.

5. He doesn’t try to change you. He knows you’re messier than him, that you always need a pet cat, and can’t cook to save your life, and all of that is all right by him.

6. When you think about marrying him, the best part isn’t the wedding, it’s the idea of spending your lives together. The wedding is fun, but you really can’t wait for the two weeks right after when you’ll get uninterrupted honeymoon time.

7. You survived a long-distance relationshipIt was hard and scary, but you love each other so much that you were able to make the necessary sacrifices to make it through with a singular goal in mind: living in the same place and being together when it was all over.

8. “I miss you” isn’t just a sweet thing you say. It’s a reality. Even if it hasn’t been that long (like, two hours) since you saw each other.

9. You don’t like having a roommate and love having your own space, but you’d still prefer to live with him. You look forward to the end of the day, not because you’ll be done with work but because you’ll get to see him again.

10. He’s your go-to person whenever you have a story to share, about work, about friends, about anything. You used to tell your parents and friends about all these things, but now you don’t call them quite as much as you used to. They don’t mind because they see how happy you are.

11. You feel comfortable planning things six months — or a year  in the future. You’re not worried you’ll have to cancel plane tickets or say you won’t be needing a plus-one after all. You feel that confident in your relationship.

12. You can cry in front of him without feeling embarrassed. He knows when to worry and when you’re just caught up in a scene of a movie.

13. When your friends complain about their significant others or the guys they’ve gone out with, you get kind of quiet because you don’t have much to contribute. You don’t want to brag, but you just don’t have to deal with any of that nonsense because your significant other is great to you.

14. He’s close with your family, and he’s made sure you’ve gotten to know his. He’ll call your dad or your grandma without any hesitation. It just makes sense that you’d go to his nephew’s birthday party, even if he’s not there.

15. He cares about your friends. If one of them is having a bad day, he suggests you go spend time with her or invite her to join the two of you for dinner. If he hasn’t heard someone’s name in a while, he asks how she’s doing.

16. He lets you vent. Sometimes when something frustrates you, you just need to go over it again and again. He doesn’t get annoyed at this, and he dismisses your apologies. The only thing that bothers him about the situation is that you’re upset and he wishes you weren’t.

17. He tells you, out of the blue, that you look hot. And it’s on the day you didn’t dry your hair or put on makeup or even change out of your T-shirt and sweatpants.

18. You can do things like travel together without fighting all the time. We’ve all seen (or been) that tragic couple fighting over where to get lunch at the airport so badly that one of them devolves into tears and puts her shades on indoors and lies across three seats in the terminal. You can do tedious things with your S.O. without all this fighting.

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I have altered my answering machine message (those of you who (whom) have called me have heard it), It is my opinion that we should not  put our phone number or name on any message for voice mail. This information  is sometimes enough to give someone an edge. My message is as follows: Please listen carefully for our message has changed, if this is a survey, we pass,  if you are seeking a donation, we gave at the office. If you are someone we know you can call our cell phones, if we do not know you , recognize your phone number or leave a message will  not call you back and we will list your number with the State and Federal “do not call lists”. Thank you. This will reduce your random calls,  allowing  you to screen them and decide if you want to answer. You can design your own but do not add any personal information, if someone knows you they will understand and hopefully understand, if not- Oh well!!

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I recently purchased a leaf collector for my riding mower, I previously collected leaves with a lawn sweeper. The lawn sweeper while much easier to use than a leaf rake (a lot easier) still left me a little more than tired and blowing leaf “dander” out of my nasal passages. The lawn sweeper allowed me to collect the many leaves in as little as 8 to 12 passes, still less time than a leaf rake. The leaf collector pulls the leaves into the mower blades where they are chopped up and blown into the collection bags at the rear of the mower. This takes as little as 3 passes and collects more as the leaves are chopped up. Once full the bags lift off and can be dumped into the burn pile. The burning  goes a lot faster as the leaves are smaller and ignite quicker and I can get rid of my weekly newspapers/ junk mail at the same time. This may appear to be a small matter but if you ever raked a lot of leaves then you can appreciate not having to do it with a rake!  Hoorake for leaf collectors!

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Summer when regular shoes disappear into closets and under beds. The sturdy and safe footwear of the non summer months  are replaced by and endless variety of footwear called “flip-flops”. These seemingly innocuous foot coverings while “cute”, cool and available in endless colors and styles are deadly!  There is a line from a Jimmy Buffett song stating how he “blew out my flip-flop, stepped on pop top” this is not hard to imagine  when wearing a shoe(?) that is held on by the power of two toes! The construction of these shoes(?) is simple and at the same time dangerous. Looking at the construction: a sole with 3 holes in it, a strap that has button type attachments that fit into those holes. The  material it is made of is a kind of foam rubber which has little body to support the foot.  When walking these shoes make a sound like “flip-flop”, hence the name. While walking the shoe looses contact with the foot except  at the toes. Looking at the act of walking, in a regular shoe the entire shoe  flexes with the foot  and remains in contact with the foot. Flip flops while cute and cool do not have that facility and are easily dislodged causing the foot to roll to one side and allowing the wearer’s ankle to turn allowing for the ankle to turn and become injured. This is the most common injury but just as bad as a break and probably as painful. When does comfort and safety trump “style”, a shoe(?) that costs from >99 to 4.00 a pair is hardly what I would wear even for style.

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 The answers to questions you did not think you wanted to ask:
Did you know the saying “God willing and the Creek don’t rise” was in reference to the Creek Indians and not a body of water? It was written by Benjamin Hawkins in the late 18th century. He was a politician and Indian diplomat. While in the south, Hawkins was requested by the President of the U.S. to return to Washington . In his response, he was said to write, “God willing and the Creek don’t rise.” Because he capitalized the word “Creek” it is deduced that he was referring to the Creek Indian tribe and not a body of water.
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In George Washington’s days, there were no cameras. One’s image was either sculpted or painted. Some paintings of George Washington showed him standing behind a desk with one arm behind his back while others showed both legs and both arms. Prices charged by painters were not based on how many people were to be painted, but by how many limbs were to be painted. Arms and legs are ‘limbs,’ therefore painting them would cost the buyer more. Hence the expression, ‘Okay, but it’ll cost you an arm and a leg.’ (Artists know hands and arms are more difficult to paint.)
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As incredible as it sounds, men and women took baths only twice a year (May and October) Women kept their hair covered, while men shaved their heads (because of lice and bugs) and wore wigs. Wealthy men could afford good wigs made from wool. They couldn’t wash the wigs, so to clean them they would carve out a loaf of bread, put the wig in the shell, and bake it for 30 minutes. The heat would make the wig big and fluffy, hence the term ‘big wig… ‘ Today we often use the term ‘here comes the Big Wig’ because someone appears to be or is powerful and wealthy.
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In the late 1700’s, many houses consisted of a large room with only one chair. Commonly, a long wide board folded down from the wall, and was used for dining. The ‘head of the household’ always sat in the chair while everyone else ate sitting on the floor. Occasionally a guest, who was usually a man, would be invited to sit in this chair during a meal.. To sit in the chair meant you were important and in charge. They called the one sitting in the chair the ‘chair man.’ Today in business, we use the expression or title ‘Chairman’ or ‘Chairman of the Board.’
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Personal hygiene left much room for improvement.. As a result, many women and men had developed acne scars by adulthood. The women would spread bee’s wax over their facial skin to smooth out their complexions. When they were speaking to each other, if a woman began to stare at another woman’s face she was told, ‘mind your own bee’s wax.’ Should the woman smile, the wax would crack, hence the term ‘crack a smile’. In addition, when they sat too close to the fire, the wax would melt . .. . Therefore, the expression ‘losing face.’
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Ladies wore corsets, which would lace up in the front. A proper and dignified woman, as in ‘straight laced’ wore a tightly tied lace.
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Common entertainment included playing cards. However, there was a tax levied when purchasing playing cards but only applicable to the ‘Ace of Spades…’ To avoid paying the tax, people would purchase 51 cards instead. Yet, since most games require 52 cards, these people were thought to be stupid or dumb because they weren’t ‘playing with a full deck..’
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Early politicians required feedback from the public to determine what the people considered important. Since there were no telephones, TV’s or radios, the politicians sent their assistants to local taverns, pubs, and bars. They were told to ‘go sip some Ale and listen to people’s conversations and political concerns. Many assistants were dispatched at different times. ‘You go sip here’ and ‘You go sip there.’ The two words ‘go sip’ were eventually combined when referring to the local opinion and, thus we have the term ‘gossip.’
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At local taverns, pubs, and bars, people drank from pint and quart-sized containers. A bar maid’s job was to keep an eye on the customers and keep the drinks coming. She had to pay close attention and remember who was drinking in ‘pints’ and who was drinking in ‘quarts,’ hence the phrase ‘minding your ‘P’s and Q’s’.
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One more: bet you didn’t know this!
In the heyday of sailing ships, all war ships and many freighters carried iron cannons. Those cannons fired round iron cannon balls. It was necessary to keep a good supply near the cannon. However, how to prevent them from rolling about the deck? The best storage method devised was a square-based pyramid with one ball on top, resting on four resting on nine, which rested on sixteen. Thus, a supply of 30 cannon balls could be stacked in a small area right next to the cannon. There was only one problem….how to prevent the bottom layer from sliding or rolling from under the others. The solution was a metal plate called a ‘Monkey’ with 16 round indentations.However, if this plate were made of iron, the iron balls would quickly rust to it. The solution to the rusting problem was to make ‘Brass Monkeys.’ Few landlubbers realize that brass contracts much more and much faster than iron when chilled. Consequently, when the temperature dropped too far, the brass indentations would shrink so much that the iron cannonballs would come right off the monkey; Thus, it was quite literally, ‘Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey.’ (All this time, you thought that was an improper expression, didn’t you.)
If you don’t send this fabulous bit of historic knowledge to any and all your unsuspecting friends, your hard drive will kill your mouse.
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Thought this article could be helpful for all of us.

Things That Make Your Home a Target for Thieves

 

by Celia Kuperszmid Lehrman
Friday, September 23, 2011

 

 

A home is robbed every 14.6 seconds and the average dollar loss per burglary is $2,119, according to statistics just released by the

Federal Bureau of Investigation. And that’s the good news because burglaries were down slightly in 2010 compared to 2009. Sure you lock your doors and windows when you’re not home (you’d be surprised how many people don’t). But here are ten things that you’re probably doing that make your home a target, and what you should do instead:

More from

ConsumerReports.org:

Some Door Locks Could Leave You Vulnerable

Online Threats to Your Security

Six Ways to Stay Safer

1. Leaving your garage door open or unlocked.

Once inside the garage, a burglar can use any tools you haven’t locked away to break into your home, out of sight of the neighbors. Interior doors between the garage and your home often aren’t as strong as exterior doors and may not have deadbolt locks.

Instead:

Always close and lock the garage door. Consider getting a garage-door opener with random codes that automatically reset.

2. Hiding spare keys.

Burglars know about fake rocks and leprechaun statues and will check under doormats, in mailboxes, and over doorways.

Instead:

Give a spare set to a neighbor or family member.

3. Storing ladders outdoors or in unlocked sheds.

Burglars can use them to reach the roof and unprotected upper floor windows.

Instead:

Keep ladders under lock and key.

4. Relying on silent alarm systems.

Everyone hates noisy alarms, especially burglars. Smart thieves know that it can take as long as 10 to 20 minutes for the alarm company or cops to show up after an alarm has been tripped.

Instead:

Have both silent and audible alarms.

5. Letting landscaping get overgrown.

Tall hedges and shrubs near the house create hiding spots for burglars who may even use overhanging branches to climb onto your roof.

Instead:

Trim any bushes and trees around your home.

6. Keeping your house in the dark.

Like overgrown landscaping, poor exterior lighting creates shadows in which burglars can work unobserved.

Instead:

Replace burned out bulbs promptly, add lighting where needed, and consider putting fixtures on motion sensors or light sensors so that they go on automatically.

7. Not securing sliding doors.

These often make tempting targets.

Instead:

When you’re out, put a dowel down in the channel, so that the door can’t be opened wide enough for a person to get through.

8. Relying on your dog to scare away burglars.

While barking my deter amateurs, serious burglars know that dogs may back away from someone wielding a weapon, or get chummy if offered a treat laced with a tranquilizer.

Instead:

Make your home look occupied by using timers to turn lights, radios, and TVs on and off in random patterns.

9. Leaving “goody” boxes by the curb.

Nothing screams “I just got a brand new flat-screen, stereo, or other big-ticket item” better than boxes by the curb with your garbage cans.

Instead:

Break down big boxes into small pieces and bundle them together so that you can’t tell what was inside.

10. Posting vacation photos on Facebook.

Burglars troll social media sites looking for targets.

Instead:

Wait until you get back before sharing vacation details or make sure your security settings only allow trusted “friends” to see what you’re up to.

Copyrighted 2009, Consumers Union of U.S., Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on Yahoo!

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Recently (last several months)  I have repaired some unusual (for me) items. I have been able to repair, remodel and/or construct many things but these two cases have expanded my knowledge and in a way my ability.  The first is a refrigerator ice maker, this was not covered by the home warranty we have.  After getting the serial and model numbers, I began to search for information. This search brought me to several sites but one in particular gave enough details to indicate that I could conceivably make this repair. I made the necessary tests to determine if the actual ice maker was at fault or the water inlet valve. I determined that the ice maker was the problem and ordered what I needed, along with a replacement water inlet valve (the existing one was corroded).  I replaced the water valve after doing some needed plumbing remodel (this involved tapping into the main water line) to shorten the water line to the refrigerator. After this little job, I installed the new ice maker and fired it up (so to speak). I was disappointed when I got no ice but I looked around and found that one of the water lines on the back had come loose during the pulling and pushing of the fridge. Re-attaching  the tube, I again waited for the ice making to start, alas no ice. I reread the instructions and found out I had not adjusted the water intake on ice maker. After making this adjustment, I soon had ice-until the defrost switch failed followed a few weeks later by the defrost coil. These two repairs required a service visit (covered under the home warranty. Happy to report the refrigerator is now working as it should. The next recent repair was replacing the antenna on my cell phone (Cell phones do not work well when the antenna breaks!)This was a real treat, once I located and received the part, 4 screws and a push later I replaced the antenna on my cell phone. So my repair resume has increased along with a little suspender snapping.

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