Skip navigation

Daily Archives: August 16th, 2018


The specific words of the saying the signs borrowed from vary; the most commonly cited version of Niemöller’s pseudo-poem, however—the one quoted by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, as a lyrical manifestation of the evils of political apathy—reads like this:
First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.
Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.
Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.
It is a reference to the Holocaust. It is also, however, a warning about the ease with which such an event could occur again, if we of the present allow ourselves to become ignorant of the lessons of the past. Niemöller, born in 1892, was German, and a Protestant. Initially a supporter of Hitler’s rise to power, Niemöller came to oppose him in the years leading up to the war: In 1933, he became the head of a group of opposition clergy members, the Pfarrernotbund, or the Pastors’ Emergency League. For that, in 1937, he was arrested and sent to the concentration camps—first to Sachsenhausen and then to Dachau. He survived until the end of the war, when the Allies liberated him and his fellow prisoners. Niemöller returned, after that, to the clergy—and he focused, for the rest of his life, on reconciliation as both a political and a theological aspiration. “First They Came” emerged from that effort.

btn_donateCC_LG

Please Donate

Advertisements

When did lying to gain an office become the norm? There was always campaign rhetoric but it was more coloring a little outside the lines. In this age of mass media coverage these line squibbles have become outright lies ala prewar Germany. The German information machine seems to be a model for the Trump method of governance by False hood and abetted by a self serving Congress whose sole objective is to appease their big donors and feather their own nests. One can liken the current administration to the Georgian rule over the “Colonies” prior to the Declaration. That declaration led to the fight for independence which was won by a smaller and lesser equipped forces. Taking that information , isn’t it time we as voters did it again? Our objective should be to have better representation than we have had for many years. The problem is not who the President is, it’s the long serving members of Congress who have abdicated their oath and duty to serve with honor under the Constitution. The conundrum is do we personally evaluate each member at election time based on what they have done in the seat or accept what they tell us?

btn_donateCC_LG

Please Donate


Bob Bryan 3h

President Donald Trump’s tariffs have put US businesses in the crosshairs of a trade war.
Bill Yeargin, the CEO of US boat manufacturer Correct Craft, warned about the consequences of Trump’s trade fights in an op-ed on Monday.
“We have found ourselves in the crosshairs of a trade war, one that will drown out the effects of tax reform and risk our industry’s promising future, taking American workers and consumers down with it,” Yeargin wrote.
The CEO also laid out the three big reasons that Trump’s tariffs hurt US businesses.

President Donald Trump’s tariffs are hitting US businesses with a triple whammy, according to one manufacturing CEO.
Bill Yeargin, the CEO of US boat manufacturer Correct Craft, laid out in an op-ed for the Washington Examiner how harmful Trump’s recent tariffs are for both his own company and the US economy as a whole.
Yeargin’s firm builds a slew of popular boat brands, such as the specialty ski brand Nautique. Correct Craft employs more than 1,300 American workers and has six manufacturing plants around the US, but despite the homegrown nature of the business, Trump’s tariffs are taking a toll.
The Correct Craft CEO said Trump’s trade fights are leading to higher costs and threaten boat sales. In fact, Yeargin said the tariffs pose an existential threat to the US boat manufacturing industry.

“We have found ourselves in the crosshairs of a trade war, one that will drown out the effects of tax reform and risk our industry’s promising future, taking American workers and consumers down with it,” he wrote.
In laying out the threat the trade war poses, Yeargin identified the three ways that Trump’s trade fights are contributing to pain for US manufacturers:
Tariffs caused the price of imported parts to increase: Tariffs act as taxes on imports, which in turn cause the prices of the goods hit with those taxes to increase. Trump slapped both Chinese aluminum sheet and all aluminum, two important elements for boat manufacturing, with substantial tariffs. Additionally, Trump’s tariffs on Chinese goods added an extra duty to pieces of boat engines, and the next wave of tariffs could hit “300 different component parts used by the marine industry.” So Correct Crafts costs are increasing, cutting into profits.
The prices of US goods are also increasing due to market distortions: Correct Craft sources nearly all of the aluminum sheet used in its boats from the US — more than 90% according to Yeargin — but this has not protected the company from price increases. As domestic producers have seen foreign prices rise, so too have US aluminum producers used this new pricing power. According to Yeargin, the price of domestic aluminum has risen by 20% to 30% due to market distortions created by the tariffs.
Retaliatory tariffs on US exports are hurting American companies that send goods abroad: Yeargin said that retaliatory tariffs on boats by Canada, Mexico, and the European Union — which represent a large portion of the firm’s overseas sales — will harm sales and “puts the industry’s $1.8 billion in recreational boat and engine exports and the jobs of Americans in jeopardy.”
Yeargin says Trump’s trade policies will come back to bite the US
Correct Craft can respond to combination of these three factors in a few different ways. The company can lay off workers to bring down labor costs, increase prices on consumers, or move its manufacturing outside of the US to a country not facing tariffs (similar to Harley-Davidson’s decision).
Given these worrying options Correct Craft faces, Yeargin concluded that Trump’s trade policies will ultimately come back to bite the US.
“Many Americans are understandably tired of longstanding and unfair trade agreements, and President Trump should be applauded for concentrating the world’s attention on the issue,” the Correct Craft CEO wrote. “However, his administration’s current trade policies of increasing protectionism are unfairly targeting US manufacturing industries, and will cause lasting damage to US businesses, jobs, and families.”

The problems aren’t just limited to boat manufacturers. American firms that produce everything from TVs to nails to lobster traps are dealing with similar cost pressures.
The cost increases are already forcing these firms to make tough choices. Some US businesses have had to lay off workers, while others are raising prices on consumers to handle the hit.
Regardless of how these companies are managing, it’s clear that Trump’s trade fights are taking a toll on American business.

btn_donateCC_LG

Please Donate

%d bloggers like this: