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Category Archives: politricks


Chris Britt Comic Strip for November 05, 2018

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Commonly in an election cycle there are and possibly always will races that get heated. In those heated races there was usually some name calling but restricted to “normal” types of name calling. In the “Trump age” that name calling has escalated to thinly veiled and overt name calling. DJT’s unwavering base has picked up his cause and let their baser selves emerge. Do we want or will we allow  these types of tactics continue or will we hold the seated and aspiring candidates to campaign in this way accountable by our votes? We should not nor cannot be guided by a Racist, homophobic, amoral leader(?). This White House resident appears to be the culmination of years of we the people paying no attention to who we have sent to Congress to represent us. Not only do we have an amoral leader but an amoral leader abetted by neer do well Congressional members. It is never too late when we as a group can instantly message these representatives daily if we so desire. The most important thing we can do is to become informed and not be swayed by baseless and empty phrases designed for distraction not information. We all might well remember that “shiny objects Tarnish” over time and should not be taken as raison d’être .

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msn news
By LINDA QIU 4 hrs ago

What Trump said:
“We’re not letting them into our country. And then they never show up, almost, it’s like a level of 3 percent. They never show up for the trial. So by the time their trial comes, they’re gone, nobody knows where they are.”
False.
President Trump was referring to the rate that migrants show up to immigration court proceedings after being apprehended and released into the United States. Data from the Justice Department shows that most immigrants do, in fact, show up to their court hearings.
In the 2017 fiscal year, about 28 percent of immigrants failed to attend their court hearings — not the 97 percent Mr. Trump estimated.
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Among asylum seekers, only 11 percent did not show up for legal proceedings. Of the asylum seekers who participated in a pilot program tested as an alternative to detention, 99 percent attended Immigration and Custom Enforcement check-ins and appointments. And 100 percent turned up for court hearings.
The Trump administration ended the pilot program last June.
What Trump said:
“We can’t get any Democrat votes to change them. It’s only the Republicans that are in unison they want to change them. They want to make strong borders.”
This is misleading
Citing immigration laws that he said “are so bad,” Mr. Trump accused Democrats of causing overhaul legislation to fizzle in Congress. Left unsaid was that disarray among the Republican Party partly contributed to the bills’ demise.
In February, after Mr. Trump moved to rescind protections for the young immigrants known as Dreamers, the Senate rejected three immigration proposals. Fourteen Republican senators voted against the one that was backed by the White House; it received the least support from the president’s own party than any of the three.
After a public outcry over the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance immigration policy that resulted in migrant children being separated from their families after crossing the border, the House rejected a hard-line immigration bill in June that was backed by the White House. Forty-one Republicans voted against it.
What Trump said:
“Nearly 100 percent of heroin in the United States enters through the southern border. Think of that, 100 percent almost of heroin comes in through the southern border, along with roughly 90 percent of cocaine and the majority of meth and a substantial portion of the ultralethal fentanyl killing our youth.”
This requires context.
Mr. Trump is right that most heroin smuggled into the United States enters through the southwest border, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration’s latest National Drug Assessment report.
Most fentanyl enters the United States from packages mailed directly from China, or through Canada from China, according to the report. Though “large volumes” of fentanyl are also smuggled through the southwest border, it tends to be less potent — and costs less — than the packages directly from China.
“We are miserably losing this fight to prevent fentanyl from entering our country and killing our citizens,” the president’s opioids commission reported last November. “We are losing this fight predominately through China.”
The drug agency also noted that the “most common method” of drug smuggling used by criminal organizations is by driving through official American ports of entry — not a migrant caravan of people on foot.
In some of those vehicles, the drugs are kept in concealed compartments; in others, they are mixed among legal goods on tractor-trailers. Smugglers also use tunnels, passenger trains and buses, drug mules and even drones and other aircraft.
What Trump said:
“The Democrat Party’s vision is to offer them free health care, free welfare, free education and even the right to vote.”
This is misleading.
Legal immigrants to the United States can receive some public benefits and have a pathway to citizenship and the right to vote. But that is a matter of law — not merely the political platform or policies of the Democratic Party.
Migrants who are granted asylum are eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid and the Supplemental Security Income program. They are also eligible for the cash assistance program known as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, according to the Congressional Research Service.
Undocumented immigrants are not eligible for most public programs and cannot vote. While a 2013 Senate bill to overhaul the immigration system would have allowed undocumented immigrants who had arrived in the United States before December 2011 to apply for citizenship, the House never voted on the legislation. Mr. Trump’s own “four pillars” for immigration reform also included a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers.
What Trump said:
“Nobody talks about that, but under President Obama, they separated children from the parents.”
This is misleading.
As The New York Times has reported, previous presidential administrations did break up families — but did so rarely, according to former officials and immigration experts. The Trump administration, by contrast, has knowingly enacted the practice that some officials have characterized as a deterrence against illegal entry.
What Trump said:
“And once that control is set and standardized and made very strong, including the building of the wall, which we’ve already started. $1.6 billion spent last year, $1.6 billion this year. We have another $1.6 that will be coming, but we want to build it at one time.”
This is misleading.
A spending bill signed by Mr. Trump in March allotted $1.6 billion for projects to replace old barriers along the border with new ones. But that bill did not allow spending funds on a new border wall.
Mr. Trump signed another spending bill in late September, which did not include any money for his border wall — a fact he seemed aware of, given his criticisms over the lack of funding.

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Published: Oct 29, 2018 6:56 p.m. ET
‘We’re America, we can handle it,’ anchor says, noting upcoming midterm elections
By Mike Murphy Editor

Fox News anchor Shepard Smith on Monday repudiated claims by President Donald Trump and his own network of the risks posed by a so-called “caravan” of migrants making its way toward the U.S. border.
“There is no invasion. No one’s coming to get you. There’s nothing at all to worry about.”
“Tomorrow the migrants, according to Fox News reporting, are more than two months away, if any of them actually come here,” Smith said on the air Monday. “But tomorrow is one week before the midterm election, which is what all of this is about.”
Trump on Monday tweeted to the Central American migrants to “go back,” adding “This is an invasion of our Country and our Military is waiting for you!”
Critics have blasted Trump for stoking anti-immigrant rhetoric and drumming up fear ahead of the upcoming midterm elections, and that message had been amplified by Fox News commentators, who on multiple occasions have portrayed the caravan as an immediate threat to the U.S.
In fact, the migrants are still about 1,000 miles from the U.S. border, and they are largely fleeing violence and poverty in their home countries and seeking asylum in the U.S.
On Monday, the U.S. military said it was sending about 5,000 troops to the border.
Smith accused Trump and other politicians of using the caravan to “gin up fear” in a cynical pre-election ploy. He noted that similar rhetoric about another migrant caravan dissipated earlier this year.
“When they did this to us, got us all riled up in April, remember?” Smith said. “The result was 14 arrests. We’re America, we can handle it. But like I said, a week to the election.”
Also see: Opinion: President Trump wants you and all Americans to be very, very afraid
For News parent 21st Century Fox FOX, +0.51% and MarketWatch parent News Corp. NWS, -1.17% share the same owner.

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Thanks to the modern media coverage America’s miscreants motivated by a Pinocchioesque  leader and aided by streaming lies are now sending bombs to public figures. There has been an uptick in public shootings by citizens and sometimes law enforcement. It is unfortunate that one person who could create unity is busily doing the opposite in spite of his staff(?) attempting to curtail his actions. Our Commander in chief” used to lead by example in spite of their personal belief’s and sometimes regrettable personal acts. What we currently have is an egotistical small minded man whose sole purpose is to make unfounded proclamations  and statements with impunity. In less than 2 years TOTUS  (the current Commander-in-Chief) has managed to undo nearly a century of progress with European alliances that have served us as we have served them in order to maintain peace and progress. There are no perfect alliances since there are so many facets of modern society yet for the most part there is a kindred spirit that links us all. Our current White House occupant has used the same strategy of chaos that he used in his business life to govern. What we as voters have is our ability to reason and to vote as informed citizens after reading and understanding information from several sources. As an informed voter we need to  eschew strict party line rhetoric from the main stream parties and any subsets to be as independent as possible based on your own research and understanding.

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By Daniel Lippman and Gabby Orr 2 hrs ago

 

Early voting points to huge turnout

At his rallies, President Donald Trump argues that the midterms are about one person — Donald Trump. “Get out in 2018,” Trump told a crowd in Missouri last month, “because you’re voting for me!”

Privately, the president says the exact opposite.
According to two people familiar with the conversations, Trump is distancing himself from a potential Republican thumping on Election Day. He’s telling confidants that he doesn’t see the midterms as a referendum on himself, describing his 2020 reelection bid as “the real election.” And he says that he holds House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell responsible for protecting their congressional majorities.
According to one person with knowledge of these talks, Trump has said of Ryan and McConnell: “These are their elections … and if they screw it up, it’s not my fault.”

Other sources said Trump is sure to lash out at perhaps his favorite bogeyman of all — the media — for allegedly opposing him.
It’s not all pre-emptive finger-pointing: Trump expresses greater confidence than most pundits about his party’s chances of maintaining its House majority and expanding its control of the Senate. And he credits McConnell for motivating GOP voters by holding the line on Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation.
But in the event of an electoral blowout, Trump is poised to shift the blame a mile down Pennsylvania Avenue.
“Look for the White House to say something like, ‘Paul Ryan chose to be a lame duck speaker instead of leaving, which cost Congress the chance to do several things before November,’” said an aide to one GOP member who speaks with the president often.
A Democratic wave would be especially awkward for a president whose brand is success, and who boasts that his record in office is unmatched by any of his modern predecessors.
Already, hints of a distancing strategy have started to creep into Trump’s public comments, even as he continues to crow at rallies that the midterms are a “referendum” on his first two years in office. Trump told the Associated Press recently that some of his supporters have said to him, “I will never ever go and vote in the midterms because you’re not running.”
Inside the White House, aides are resigned to the fact that Trump — as he has often done — will follow his gut on how to message any Democratic takeover of the House on Nov. 6. Those around Trump are anticipating lots of unfiltered, early-morning tweets casting blame on everyone but the president.
“It would be a lot of shooting from the hip in early morning Twitter,” said a well-placed Republican source, who added that the White House seems to lack clear plans for post-election messaging.
The themes are already predictable.
“The arc is gonna be he wasn’t on the ballot, and people didn’t fully appreciate his policies and [candidates] didn’t tie themselves enough to him,” said a person close to the president, who was among several sources to say Trump will likely blame the media as well.
While lashing out would be a Trumpian response, it would also be a break from recent presidential precedent. After losing the Congress to Democrats midway through his second term in 2006, a humbled George W. Bush conceded that he’d taken a “thumpin’,” pushed out an unpopular Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, and vowed to find “common ground” with Democrats.
Four years later, after a Tea Party wave swamped congressional Democrats two years into his first term, with Republicans picking up 63 House seats for the biggest midterm gain by either party since 1938, Barack Obama took “direct responsibility” in remarks afterward. Calling the moment “humbling,” Obama vowed to “do a better job.”
Although White House officials are aware of those precedents, Trump may not care about them. And he alone will decide how to spin the midterm results, with his aides following his lead. The White House declined to comment on the record for this story.
“Despite whatever [way] they may want to spin it … he’s going to drive the train on this and the White House is gonna fall and say the president did everything he could, but unfortunately he’s not on the ballot and so people weren’t as excited,” said the person close to Trump.
Before he was president, Trump had a philosophy on whether leaders should accept blame: “Whatever happens, you’re responsible. If it doesn’t happen you’re responsible.”
But once in office, Trump, backed up by his communications team, has shifted blame for setbacks to others — especially Congress.
After efforts to repeal Obama’s health care law stalled in Congress last July, the president blamed “a few Republicans” for holding up the process, despite creating considerable confusion on Capitol Hill with his own mixed signals on healthcare reform. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders echoed Trump’s line, saying it would be “absolutely ridiculous for Congress to try to place the blame on the president for the inability to get their job done.”
And when Trump’s endorsement of Roy Moore failed to carry the Alabama Senate candidate to victory last December, the president claimed he was pressured into backing the wrong candidate. Those around him reinforced his claim.
“There does need to be a recognition of the lousy political advice @POTUS has been getting and it needs to change,” Tony Fabrizio, a top Republican pollster involved in Trump’s 2016 campaign, wrote on Twitter at the time.
“We’re in a completely different dynamic now where we know President Trump will be perfectly comfortable in a finger-pointing exercise,” said a former senior George W. Bush aide, who claimed his boss, by comparison, “was perfectly fine with owning and taking some of the heat off the Hill leadership” after the 2006 midterms two years before Bush left office.
A former senior Obama administration official, who recalled cringing when the ex-president used the term “shellacking” to describe the results of the 2010 midterms, said the White House “took stock” of the situation afterward and determined Obama could continue chipping away at his agenda through “either executive authority or working at the state and local level.”
“I only cringed because it was so true … We were shellacked,” this person said, adding that Obama nevertheless displayed “a willingness to accept responsibility and not wallow in defeat.”
Should Trump buck that trend by refusing to bear any blame, some Republicans said they would be disappointed — albeit not surprised.
“The president’s rhetoric is what’s actually energized the left, so it would be hard to put it on Congress if we lost the House,” a senior GOP aide told POLITICO. “But it’s just classic behavior on the part of this president to not shoulder the blame if things go bad, and to definitely take responsibility if things go right.”
Still, some of Trump’s most steadfast allies say he would be justified to turn his ire toward congressional Republicans if November becomes a bloodbath for the party in power. They claim he has done “everything possible,” like holding back-to-back-to-back campaign rallies last week, to assist GOP candidates battling for their seats or seeking to upset Democratic incumbents.
“I think [Trump] has done everything that has been asked of him from the Republican Party to … help campaign and raise money wherever they have needed it,” said ex-Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski. “President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence has answered that call every time.”

The liar continues, looking at his private statements, TOTUS is already throwing the Congress under the bus. One of his other lies is that the migrant group has criminals and unknown Middle Easterners among them with no proof and has not considered assisting the countries they are fleeing from  to correct their problems with more U.S. aid so that  those fleeing can remain in their respective countries. Totus’ focus is purely on himself not America or any other country .MA

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Reason to vote, the so called “Blue Wave” is a thing someone made up but it is possible. If we are to turn the tide on the current administration’s bizarre behavior abetted by the “NEER DO WELL” Congress, every concerned citizen needs to vote. It is clear that in some States laws have been modified or put in place to suppress the vote. These are the areas that need attention and possible repair. The major factor in turning the election towards a more civil and responsive government is still the vote. Not voting has as much effect as the actual vote. Understanding the issues is hard but in this administration it is easier. We have a Leader(?) who is so self absorbed that he cannot effectively govern unless there is chaos which makes the administration ineffective but in his eyes this is good policy. The Congress is so invested in maintaining power as to allow TOTUS to run roughshod over the normal rules of governing to the extent of alienating our long time allies across the world. It is clear that the changes will only come from the voters who ignore the rhetoric but understand and seek the facts. Taking on political labels is akin to buying substandard clothing because of a well know label. Adherence to facts and truth is the best voting Standard, all else will right itself.

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October 10, 20184:02 PM ET
Heard on All Things Considered

Scott Horsley

President Trump attends a signing ceremony for health care measures in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Wednesday, the same day USA Today published an opinion column on the topic by the president.
Win McNamee/Getty Images
USA Today published an opinion column by President Trump Wednesday in which the president falsely accused Democrats of trying to “eviscerate” Medicare, while defending his own record of protecting health care coverage for seniors and others.
The column — published just weeks ahead of the midterm elections — underscores the political power of health care to energize voters. But it makes a number of unsubstantiated claims.
Here are 5 points to know
1. The political context: Health care has emerged as a dominant issue on the campaign trail in the runup to the November elections. According to the Wesleyan Media Project, which tracks congressional advertising, health care was the focus of 41 percent of all campaign ads in September, outpacing taxes (20 percent), jobs (13 percent) and immigration (9 percent). Democrats are particularly focused on health care, devoting 50 percent of their ads to the issue, but health care is also a leading issue in Republican commercials (28 percent), second only to taxes (32 percent).
Perhaps sensing that Democrats are gaining traction, Trump has decided to go on the attack, targeting the Democratic proposal known as “Medicare for All.”
2. Cost of the plan: Trump claims that expanding the federal government’s Medicare program would cost $32.6 trillion over a decade. But as Business Insider reports, that would actually be a discount compared with the nation’s current health care bill.
Trump’s figure was calculated by the libertarian Mercatus Center, but he fails to note that total health care spending under Medicare for All would be about $2 trillion less over the decade than currently projected. The federal government would pay more, but Americans on the whole would pay less.
Remember that the U.S. already spends far more per person on health care than does any other country. And when you count the tax break for employer-provided insurance, the federal government already pays about two-thirds of this bill. But because of the fragmented private insurance system, the government gets none of the efficiency or buying power that a single-payer system would provide.
3. Health care rationing: Trump claims — with no supporting evidence — that “the Democratic plan would inevitably lead to the massive rationing of health care. Doctors and hospitals would be put out of business. Seniors would lose access to their favorite doctors. There would be long wait lines for appointments and procedures. Previously covered care would effectively be denied.”

Detailed implementation of any single-payer plan would of course be subject to substantial negotiation. But the Medicare for All bill drafted by Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., states explicitly that “Nothing in this Act shall prohibit an institutional or individual provider from entering into a private contract with an enrolled individual for any item or service” outside the plan.
4. Pre-existing conditions: Trump notes that as a candidate, he “promised that we would protect coverage for patients with pre-existing conditions.” In fact, Trump and his fellow Republicans tried — unsuccessfully — to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which guarantees insurance coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. GOP plans would leave it up to the states to craft alternative protections. In addition, Republican attorneys general have sued to overturn Obamacare’s protections, and the Trump administration has declined to defend them.
America’s Health Insurance Plans, the trade group for the insurance industry, warns that ending the Obamacare guarantee could result in hardship for the estimated 130 million Americans under 65 with pre-existing conditions.
“Removing those provisions will result in renewed uncertainty in the individual market, create a patchwork of requirements in the states, cause rates to go even higher for older Americans and sicker patients, and make it challenging to introduce products and rates for 2019,” AHIP said in a statement in June.
5. Strength of Medicare: Trump writes that “Democrats have already harmed seniors by slashing Medicare by more than $800 billion over 10 years to pay for Obamacare. Likewise, Democrats would gut Medicare with their planned government takeover of American health care.”
He is repeating a claim that was widely debunked during the 2012 election. The Affordable Care Act actually strengthened the solvency of Medicare, but it has since been weakened again by the GOP tax cut.
The president is trying to play on the fears of seniors — who vote in large numbers — with the claim that any effort to improve health security for younger Americans must come at their expense. But that is a false choice.

Tom Toles Comic Strip for October 19, 2018

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Bloomberg Tue, Oct 16 12:09 PM CDT

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday blamed rising federal deficits and debt on a bipartisan unwillingness to contain spending on Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, and said he sees little chance of a major deficit reduction deal while Republicans control Congress and the White House.
“It’s disappointing but it’s not a Republican problem,” McConnell said in an interview with Bloomberg News when asked about the rising deficits and debt. “It’s a bipartisan problem: Unwillingness to address the real drivers of the debt by doing anything to adjust those programs to the demographics of America in the future.”
McConnell’s remarks came a day after the Treasury Department said the U.S. budget deficit grew to $779 billion in Donald Trump’s first full fiscal year as president, the result of the GOP’s tax cuts, bipartisan spending increases and rising interest payments on the national debt. That’s a 77 percent increase from the $439 billion deficit in fiscal 2015, when McConnell became majority leader.
McConnell said it would be “very difficult to do entitlement reform, and we’re talking about Medicare, Social Security and Medicaid,” with one party in charge of Congress and the White House.
“I think it’s pretty safe to say that entitlement changes, which is the real driver of the debt by any objective standard, may well be difficult if not impossible to achieve when you have unified government,” McConnell said.
Politically Unpopular
Shrinking those popular programs — either by reducing benefits or raising the retirement age — without a bipartisan deal would risk a political backlash in the next election. Trump, during his campaign, promised he wouldn’t cut Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid, even though his budget proposals have included trims to all three programs.
McConnell said he had many conversations on the issue with former President Barack Obama, a Democrat.
“He was a very smart guy, understood exactly what the problem was, understood divided government was the time to do it, but didn’t want to, because it was not part of his agenda,” McConnell said.
“I think it would be safe to say that the single biggest disappointment of my time in Congress has been our failure to address the entitlement issue, and it’s a shame, because now the Democrats are promising Medicare for all,” he said. “I mean, my gosh, we can’t sustain the Medicare we have at the rate we’re going and that’s the height of irresponsibility.”
Divided Government
McConnell said the last major deal to overhaul entitlements occurred in the Reagan administration, when a Social Security package including a raise in the retirement age passed with divided government.
McConnell said he was the GOP Senate whip in 2005 when President George W. Bush attempted a Social Security overhaul and couldn’t find any Democratic supporters.
“Their view was, you want to fix Social Security, you’ve got the presidency, you’ve got the White House, you’ve got the Senate, you go right ahead,” McConnell said. The effort collapsed.
The Office of Management and Budget has projected a deficit in the coming year of $1.085 trillion despite a healthy economy. And the Congressional Budget Office has forecast a return to trillion-dollar deficits by fiscal 2020.
During Trump’s presidency, Democrats and Republicans agreed to a sweeping deal to increase discretionary spending on defense and domestic programs, while Trump’s efforts to shrink spending on Obamacare mostly fell flat.
Republicans also passed a 2017 tax overhaul projected to add more than $1 trillion to the debt over a decade after leaders gave up on creating a plan that wouldn’t increase the debt under the Senate’s scoring rules. However, McConnell, like many Republicans, has said growth will more than make up for the lost revenue.
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California reacted to McConnell’s comments Tuesday by saying the rising deficit is a direct result of the GOP tax cut enacted in December 2017.
“In budget after budget, congressional Republicans have exposed their cynical agenda: give massive, unpaid-for handouts to further enrich big corporations shipping jobs overseas and the wealthiest 1 percent, and stick seniors, children and families with the bill,” Pelosi said in a statement. “Under the GOP’s twisted agenda, we can afford tax cuts for billionaires, but not the benefits our seniors have earned.”

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The party in power has advanced another neer do well to a high profile position in government. It is pretty clear that the Dupublicans have done all that they can to maintain power at whatever cost. Our CIC, Senate and House leaders are too busy staying in office to do the job of representing  ALL Americans (you know-the people they so readily invoke when they tell us what THEY want). What I fail to understand is why there appears to be such strong support for people whose amoral (immoral?) character is evident by so many  who profess to be religious. In other countries  religion seems to overshadow the government, is it possible that the “conservative Evangelicals” are doing the same via voting for imperfect candidates who happen to support specific items of their agenda? We as voters have to  forget what the main poLItical* parties say and look at what they do as the two are often different. We have a group of 535 cowards who we elected to do what’s best for US not themselves. The positions  of Congressional representatives have  been about power for years now while coincidentally governing and except in rare cases that has always been “OK” for most of us. The big issue is the tacit approval by us because we seemingly do not care enough to read what they are doing but we listen to pundits, talking heads and utterances from outside sources who are armed by our representatives with what they want us to hear. The idea of “only the best people” will be chosen to serve in the administration has become a code word for people who will kow tow to TOTUS while following their own agenda which does not and has not do anything for the often cited “American People”. This administration is all about rolling back any and all previous administration actions that benefit “ALL Americans” not just a select few. Look at EPA, Education, Housing actions which affect the all Americans from the poorest to the middle class and often beyond. Think about the potential  changes to our way of living via Supreme Court decisions and decide if we are going in a good direction. We will certainly hit a low before we get to a “normalcy”.

*LI is capitalized reflecting the basis of many political speeches these days

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