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Daily Archives: September 21st, 2018


Jay Busbee,Yahoo Sports 17 hours ago .

Colin Kaepernick is one of eight notable Americans being honored by Harvard University for contributions to black history and culture. The Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard will present Kaepernick, comedian Dave Chappelle and others with the W.E.B. Du Bois award on Oct. 11.

Kaepernick’s story
Kaepernick, a former quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, began kneeling during the national anthem during the 2016 preseason as a way of protesting police brutality and racial injustice. The move set off a national debate, with critics of Kaepernick’s move fixating on whether it was unpatriotic while supporters in the NFL have begun building bridges between police and the communities they serve.
Kaepernick remains unsigned by any NFL team despite possessing quarterback skills that are certainly the equal of many of the league’s signal-callers, and it’s impossible to say that Kaepernick’s strident public statements didn’t have a role in that.
After a year of virtual silence, a period in which critics up to the president of the United States attacked the act of Kaepernick’s protest without addressing its purpose, Kaepernick has begun returning to public life. Most recently, he became the centerpiece of a new Nike ad campaign that, predictably, divided Americans along political lines.
Kaepernick’s honors
The W.E.B. Du Bois awards recognize ”significant contributions to African and African American history and culture” and ”individuals who advocate for intercultural understanding and human rights.” Kaepernick has arranged for $1 million in donations to a range of charitable causes. His jersey and other mementos have been added to a “Black Lives Matter” collection at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History.
As Kaepernick’s days as an NFL quarterback appear over and continue to recede into the past, it’s apparent he will be moving into a more activist role going forward.

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TOTUS has packed his cabinet and staff with the “best people” who have proceeded to pull the country deeper into division and debt under the auspices of a neer do well Congress. Now TOTUS wants to put another Justice on the high court whose values do not reflect the values of the American people as a whole. The current nominee has some accusations similar to Justice Thomas’s so do we want another Justice to serve under a cloud that could predict his judgement on future and existing law? Could it be that “best people” are people whose morality is on a par with TOTUS? The time is now to express our dissatisfaction for this administrations lack of leadership on many fronts. It is well to remember that our Congress is as much at fault as TOTUS as they are moving their one-sided agenda under the cover of TOTUS. There are no redeeming characteristics for most of the Congress and the staff of the White House so it is our job as the “Bosses” of the Administration and Congress we need to be sure we are getting the best people in office. The way we accomplish this is to understand how any laws, executive orders and ALL legislation affects us now and later. High court decisions have huge impact on all of us. Having an unbalanced court is why we have the unending flow of billions of dollars in campaigns from private and corporate donors. These donors want people elected that will benefit them not us (the American People).  The special interest groups have control of our country through the Congress and the minimally informed TOTUS. Forget party and vote as informed Americans.

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Hiring ‘the best people’ shouldn’t be this difficult
05/12/16 10:40 AM—Updated 05/12/16 10:49 AM

By Steve Benen
Donald Trump likes to boast about his ability to hire extraordinary employees. The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin joked a couple of months ago, “Donald Trump brags that as president he will hire the best people, the greatest people. They’ll be so great, you’ll be sick of great people.”

If only Trump’s claims were in any way true. In the private sector, the New York Republican struggled to hire the best people, but as a presidential candidate, he’s surrounded himself with a rather woeful team.

And the problem is arguably getting worse. Politico reported yesterday:
Donald Trump’s campaign has enlisted influential conservative economists to revise his tax package and make it more politically palatable by slashing the $10 trillion sticker price. […]

[T]he campaign last month contacted at least two prominent conservative economists – Larry Kudlow, the CNBC television host, and Stephen Moore of the Heritage Foundation and a longtime Wall Street Journal writer – to spearhead an effort to update the package.
I realize that Kudlow and Moore probably aren’t household names, but if these are the folks Team Trump is turning to, it’s a reminder as to just how bad the campaign is at choosing “the best people” for key tasks.

Under a “Send in the Clowns” headline, the New York Times’ Paul Krugman seemed gobsmacked yesterday by the campaign’s selection.

Granted that Trump is deeply ignorant about policy; still, you might have thought that he would try to signal his independence from the establishment by, say, turning to some business economist. Instead, he turned to the usual suspects from the right-wing noise machine. And what a choice!

I mean, Kudlow is to economics what William Kristol is to political strategy: if he says something, you know it’s wrong. When he ridiculed “bubbleheads” who thought overvalued real estate could bring down the economy, you should have rushed for the bomb shelters; when he proclaimed Bush a huge success, because a rising stock market is the ultimate verdict on a presidency (unless the president is a Democrat), you should have known that the Bush era would end with epochal collapse.

And then there’s Moore, who has a similarly awesome forecasting record, and adds to it an impressive lack of even minimal technical competence.
All things considered, Krugman may be understating matters when it comes to Moore’s qualifications for writing a presidential candidate’s tax plan.

Maybe they’ll surprise everyone and produce a credible blueprint for Team Trump? It’s certainly possible, but according to the Politico report, Kudlow has already started tweaking the candidate’s original plan, and he now believes Trump’s policy will only add $3.8 trillion to the deficit over the next decade.

This, evidently, is supposed to be seen as a major step in the right direction since Trump’s original plan added $10 trillion to the deficit.

I can’t wait to see what else “the best people” come up with.


Hiring ‘the best people’ shouldn’t be this difficult
05/12/16 10:40 AM—Updated 05/12/16 10:49 AM

By Steve Benen
Donald Trump likes to boast about his ability to hire extraordinary employees. The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin joked a couple of months ago, “Donald Trump brags that as president he will hire the best people, the greatest people. They’ll be so great, you’ll be sick of great people.”

If only Trump’s claims were in any way true. In the private sector, the New York Republican struggled to hire the best people, but as a presidential candidate, he’s surrounded himself with a rather woeful team.

And the problem is arguably getting worse. Politico reported yesterday:
Donald Trump’s campaign has enlisted influential conservative economists to revise his tax package and make it more politically palatable by slashing the $10 trillion sticker price. […]

[T]he campaign last month contacted at least two prominent conservative economists – Larry Kudlow, the CNBC television host, and Stephen Moore of the Heritage Foundation and a longtime Wall Street Journal writer – to spearhead an effort to update the package.
I realize that Kudlow and Moore probably aren’t household names, but if these are the folks Team Trump is turning to, it’s a reminder as to just how bad the campaign is at choosing “the best people” for key tasks.

Under a “Send in the Clowns” headline, the New York Times’ Paul Krugman seemed gobsmacked yesterday by the campaign’s selection.

Granted that Trump is deeply ignorant about policy; still, you might have thought that he would try to signal his independence from the establishment by, say, turning to some business economist. Instead, he turned to the usual suspects from the right-wing noise machine. And what a choice!

I mean, Kudlow is to economics what William Kristol is to political strategy: if he says something, you know it’s wrong. When he ridiculed “bubbleheads” who thought overvalued real estate could bring down the economy, you should have rushed for the bomb shelters; when he proclaimed Bush a huge success, because a rising stock market is the ultimate verdict on a presidency (unless the president is a Democrat), you should have known that the Bush era would end with epochal collapse.

And then there’s Moore, who has a similarly awesome forecasting record, and adds to it an impressive lack of even minimal technical competence.
All things considered, Krugman may be understating matters when it comes to Moore’s qualifications for writing a presidential candidate’s tax plan.

Maybe they’ll surprise everyone and produce a credible blueprint for Team Trump? It’s certainly possible, but according to the Politico report, Kudlow has already started tweaking the candidate’s original plan, and he now believes Trump’s policy will only add $3.8 trillion to the deficit over the next decade.

This, evidently, is supposed to be seen as a major step in the right direction since Trump’s original plan added $10 trillion to the deficit.

I can’t wait to see what else “the best people” come up with.

 

 

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