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Daily Archives: September 29th, 2018


It is our job to get the right information and demand proper investigation when required. This latest debacle with the Senate Hearing on Judge Kavanaugh is a disgrace and shows up our “representatives” for the cowards that they are. So it is OK for Bill Cosby to be prosecuted for events from 20 -30 years ago but not for a potential High Court Judge? Can’t say if its Racism but a sexual miscreant is the same no matter what Race they are! Considering who we have sitting in the Oval office and possibly in Congress are we surprised? It is so important that we as voters recognize that we are the real power in government and  we must vote for the right people and voice our opinions whenever or wherever we can. We should not be taken in by political ads that attack or mislead, these are the instruments of dishonest people or factions no matter what high-sounding labels they give themselves. We are currently experiencing a hardly believable era of influential people in and out of Government whose sole objective is have things their way and convince us that their actions are good for us. This occurred in the 1930’s Germany and the 1950′ s America with Sen. Joe McCarthy. If we let The Senate and TOTUS get away with this, what’s next?

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Associated Press 11 hrs ago

Students protest return of Kavanaugh.
WASHINGTON — Educational, legal and religious institutions important to the life of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have come out with calls to either delay or outright cancel the confirmation process.

The calls from the dean of Yale Law School, the president of the American Bar Association, and the magazine of the Jesuit religious order come as the Senate wrestles with how to proceed with the Kavanaugh nomination in the face of allegations of sexual assault.
The most recent of these calls came from Yale, Kavanaugh’s alma mater for both undergraduate studies and law school. Heather Gerken, dean of the Yale Law School, called Friday for a delay pending additional investigations into allegations against Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct in both high school and college. Proceeding with the confirmation without those investigations would be against “the best interest of the court or our profession,” Gerken wrote.
Gerken’s statement follows the ABA’s call for a delay.
In a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee released Thursday, ABA President Robert Carlson said the vote on Kavanaugh should proceed “only after an appropriate background check into the allegations … is completed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.”
Carlson argued that a lifetime appointment to the high court “is simply too important to rush to a vote.”
Earlier this month, the ABA’s Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary gave its highest rating of “well-qualified” to Kavanaugh. Committee member Paul T. Moxley said in a statement to the Judiciary Committee that Kavanaugh, “enjoys an excellent reputation for integrity and is a person of outstanding character.”
Kavanaugh and others had cited the ABA’s high regard of Kavanaugh as proof of his professional and moral bona fides.
Kavanaugh himself testified to his “unanimous well-qualified rating from the American Bar Association,” while Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said, “If you lived a good life people will recognize it like the American Bar Association has — the gold standard.”
On Friday morning, Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley played down the significance of the ABA position. The Iowa Republican described the ABA as an interest group like any other, and said the letter represented the view of an individual, not necessarily the whole organization. “We’re not going to let them dictate our committee’s business,” Grassley said.
The committee subsequently voted to send the nomination to the full Senate, though Senate Republicans later agreed to delay the full vote for one week to allow an FBI investigation of the allegations.
The Jesuits took an even stronger stance. Following Thursday’s testimony by Kavanaugh and his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, the magazine of the Jesuit religious order in the United States publicly withdrew its endorsement of Kavanaugh. An editorial in America Magazine declared that “this nomination is no longer in the best interests of the country.”
Kavanaugh was a student at Georgetown Preparatory School, a Jesuit high school, when the alleged assault took place.
The editorial doesn’t attempt to parse whether Kavanaugh’s or Ford’s testimony was more credible. But it concluded that “in a world that is finally learning to take reports of harassment, assault and abuse seriously,” the nomination must be abandoned.
“If Senate Republicans proceed with his nomination, they will be prioritizing policy aims over a woman’s report of an assault,” it states. “Were he to be confirmed without this allegation being firmly disproved, it would hang over his future decisions on the Supreme Court for decades and further divide the country.”
The magazine had previously given Kavanaugh a full-throated endorsement, stating that his addition to the Supreme Court may furnish the fifth vote needed to overrule Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion nationwide. The Catholic Church firmly opposes abortion.
That original endorsement editorial concluded that “anyone who recognizes the humanity of the unborn should support” Kavanaugh’s nomination.
The reversal is significant given that Kavanaugh has cited his Catholic faith and Jesuit education in defending himself against Ford’s accusations. In his opening statement Thursday, Kavanaugh twice referenced his years as a student at Georgetown Prep.

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Will TOTUS bring these jobs back? MA
Chris Isidore 10 hrs ag

Sears, the company known for DieHard batteries and Kenmore appliances has been selling assets, most notably its Craftsman tool brand. After years of losing money and Amazon’s sales in North America surging, Sears has said that there is “substantial doubt” it will be able to keep its doors open. Sears, Roebuck & Company was founded by Richard Warren Sears and Alvah Curtis Roebuck in 1886.
Sears stock has fallen into the bargain bin.
In the latest indignity for a once-grand retailer, the share price fell below $1 on Friday for the first time in the company’s history, dropping as much as 15% to 85 cents in midday trading.
Falling into loose-change territory is more than embarrassing. Nasdaq, the exchange where Sears stock trades, could delist the company. That’s a long process and would happen next year at the earliest.
Shares of Sears Holdings had already plunged 88% in the past year. They took another blow Monday, when CEO and primary shareholder Eddie Lampert warned the board that the company was running out of time and cash. He said Sears must restructure and cut its debt “without delay.”
Click here to see Sears Holdings’ (SHLD) latest share price
Lampert pointed to a $134 million debt payment due on October 15, and said the company must demonstrate to lenders by Monday that it has required levels of cash in reserve, which could itself prove difficult.
Sears’ market value has fallen to less than $100 million. Lampert recently offered to buy the Kenmore appliance line through his hedge fund for $400 million, suggesting that the Kenmore brand on its own is worth more than four times as much as the whole company.
All of which is a stunning reversal for a company that was once not only the nation’s largest retailer, but also its largest employer.
In its heyday, Sears was both the Walmart and Amazon of its time. In the late 19th century and early decades of the 20th century, many Americans bought mass-produced goods for the first time through the Sears catalog. Most lived on farms and in small towns, and had previously made many of the goods they needed, such as clothes and furniture, themselves.
Sears stores helped reshape America itself, drawing shoppers away from traditional Main Street merchants and into malls, contributing to the suburbanization of the country after World War II. And its appliances introduced many American homes to labor-saving devices that changed family dynamics.
But long before the rise of Amazon and online shopping, Sears struggled to keep up with changing shopping habits.
Big box retailers such as Walmart beat it on both price and selection. In 1999, Sears was booted out of the Dow Jones industrial average, where it had been for 75 years. Home Depot took its place.
In more recent years, Sears has struggled just to stay alive.
It told investors last year that there was “substantial doubt” it could stay in business. Lampert’s latest warning to the board raised a similar warning. He said it was in the best interest of creditors and shareholders to restructure the company “as a going concern.”
Sears has lost $11.7 billion since 2010, its last profitable year, and sales have plunged 60% in that time. It has fewer than 900 stores, down from a combined 3,500 US stores when Sears and Kmart merged in 2005.
In July, the company closed the last Sears store in Chicago, its former hometown. And the company recently announced that 46 more stores will close just before the holiday shopping season.

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